Tools of the Trade - Specialization & Practice Pay Off

By Andy Sabisch
From page 44 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This month’s column is intended to provide some “food for thought” and help readers formulate a plan of attack for 2013 so that one’s finds meet or exceed expectations.
Over the decades that I have been involved in the hobby, I consistently run into two groups of treasure hunters at shows, seminars, hunts or club meetings.
The first includes those that have the passion and are excited about getting out for some hunting, yet never seem to bring home those landmark finds that show up on the find table or appear in posts online with any degree of consistency.
Sure, there is the occasional “lucky find” that turns up, but they are not unearthed with any regularity.



State Treasures - Utah

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Col. Johnson’s Army Arms Cache
UTAH COUNTY - Hoping to avoid religious persecution in the states, in 1847 Brigham Young brought the faithful out west onto the frontier where they settled the Great Salt Lake Valley.
The industrious Mormons immediately went to work establishing a number of settlements in the valley, laying out territorial boundaries, and establishing a government and laws.
At that time in Washington, Mormons were seen as a dangerous threat that many believed should be put down with military force; this resulted in a state of cold war between the U.S. and the Saints.
Col. Albert Sydney Johnson, with 1,200 troops, was dispatched to the Utah Territory to keep the Mormons in check; this contingent soon became known as Johnson’s Army.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 47 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Can I use a regular coin rapped (sic) in gold leaf to simulate a gold coin for training? Will the test coin sound like a real gold coin? I use a Tesoro LBST.
Thanks,
Doug Anderson



Find It!

By Matt Blackburn
From page 30 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The one thing all treasure hunters can agree upon is we like finding stuff!
The types of things found obviously vary from person to person or location to location.
But in the end there is a certain thrill involved in the discovery.
In fact some people get as much thrill looking for the item as they do when they actually find it.
Still, finding it is a common thread I’d guess in the DNA of probably all humans on earth.
The thrill of the hunt is a game, albeit sometimes the older you get the more frustrated you might become, especially if you are the one that lost what you are seeking to find. 
But that is not the treasure hunt I’m referring to. No, the one I’m interested in is the one that involves a search for treasure.



Money Talk: Doubled Dies - Pivoted Hub Doubling

By Frank Colletti
From page 32 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This month’s column was inspired by the multitude of mistaken responses to questions on many Internet coin collecting forums.
Perhaps one of the most misunderstood coin variety descriptions is the term “doubled die.”
Far too often a coin is shown where apparent doubling is displayed and the owner claims the discovery of some form of rare previously unlisted doubled die.
Most of the time this apparent doubling is what is referred to as strike doubling (also called mechanical doubling or machine doubling).
This is simply explained as when the die strikes a coin and “scrapes” the surface of the coin prior to ejecting the piece.
The resulting doubling is actually movement of the metal on the surface of the coin.



Mystery of the Frank Gabriel Blacksmith Shop

By Andrew Hind
From page 53 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The air is thick with smoke and the scent of burning coals. The heat of the forge’s fire is almost oppressive.
The incessant ringing of hammer on anvil, literally banging metal into a new form, taxes even the most robust of men.
There’s no doubt about it; blacksmithing is a young, fit man’s vocation.
And yet Novar-native Frank Gabriel continued his trade well into his advanced years, and despite being near-crippled with arthritis.
Gabriel was an impressive man and it’s fitting that his blacksmith shop has been recreated among the dozen authentically restored buildings on display at Muskoka Heritage Place.
Here, a spiritual descendent of Gabriel, modern-day smith D.J. Brown, carries on the memory and trade of Frank Gabriel.



Tools of the Trade - Digging Up History at Mine Run

By Chris Gholson
From page 56 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was a humid day and the shady spot I found near the forest’s edge was the perfect place to take a break.
From this vantage point I had a clear view of the grassy fields below. It was high ground and would have been a strategic spot to hunker do
I tried to envision what this same plot of land would have looked like 149 years ago.
I closed my eyes and let the present slip away.
The more I relax, the easier it is to zone out the background noises until eventually all I hear are the sounds of the leaves rustling above.
Then the seemingly perfect calm is broken by the whinny of a horse in the distance.
Seconds later the world erupts with a violent cavalcade of gunfire.



How To: A Treasure Trove of Treasure Sites

By Jerry Eckhart
From page 6 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From one day to the next it seems that someone calls or visits with one question in mind.
That question is invariably the same.
Where do you find all your places to treasure hunt?
In the past, I have skirted around the question, giving rather vague answers.
I figured that anyone who is interested in finding coins, relics or treasure should have enough gumption to find their own locations. 
It seems I was wrong, because most beginning treasure hunters do not have enough experience to think outside of the treasure box.
They read a number of books and magazines and only get the tip of the iceberg as far as finding worthwhile sites are concerned.



Finding Treasure With A Detector

By John Christopher Fine
From page 59 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When I was learning to fly a plane I resisted putting complete reliance on instruments. I tried to second-guess the compass, turn and bank indicator, and artificial horizon.
It is natural enough to rely on visual clues since I was flying in daylight. Eventually, as I became a better pilot, I relied on the instruments.
The same can be said about treasure detecting with a Pulse Induction instrument. Early on I doubted the signals. If the dig was too arduous I gave up, attributing the signal to some fault in the detector.
Metal detectors have advanced dramatically since the advent of micro-chip computer technology.
I do a great deal of underwater detecting, some in areas where Spanish galleons have been wrecked in the fury of hurricanes.



The Petrified Gemstones

By Pat Hughes
From page 8 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Everyone knows that gems take a long time to be created. However, there are two types of gemstones to be found - organic and inorganic.
The organic gems take just as long to be made and are the most fun to search for.
The word fossil means “dug up” and they are the remains of prehistoric life or other direct evidence that such life existed.
Fossil usually refers to plants and animals that have become petrified or “turned to stone.” 
Mineral petrifaction occurs when water dissolves the original hard parts of plants or animals and replaces them with mineral matter. 
This type of fossilization produces some of the most complete and detailed fossils ever found.



Staying Warm and Toasty

By John Minges
From page 62 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For those that love the great outdoors nothing can dampen spirits more than being bone chilling cold.
We all want to experience a great time hunting for treasure. For some this means swinging the detector or for others it’s digging in the dirt for the elusive yellow metal. Maybe it is both for you!
Regardless, nothing compares to breathing in the fresh air and being in the great outdoors to renew both the spirit and the mind!
When the temperature drops you know adventure still awaits you. I’ve got a few tips for you from the folks who know how to keep warm, because they spend their time in Antarctica!



Coca-Cola Bottles, International Icons

By J.C. Fine
From page 10 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Coca-Cola* is an American tradition that has become a world icon.
The syrup began as a patent medicine when invented by Dr. John S. Pemberton, an Atlanta, Georgia, pharmacist, in 1886.
It is said that he took his mixture down the street to Jacobs’ Pharmacy and told the clerk to add carbonated water.
Patrons at the soda fountain sampled it, liked it, and the pharmacy began dispensing it for five cents a glass.
Pemberton had a bookkeeper with flourished handwriting. It was this bookkeeper, Frank Robinson, that named the drink Coca-Cola and created the logotype, which remains the company trademark today.
The company was sold to Asa Candler, a clever entrepreneur that opened syrup plants around the country.



Rockefeller's Buried Treasure

By The Hangman
From page 16 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


KIOWA COUNTY, KS – After researching this story for Lost Treasure, I believe this treasure remains buried in Kansas and with additional research could be recovered.
When the events connected to this story occurred, residents living around Belvidere did search for this hoard with probes.
It was before the advent of the metal detector and, over time, residents got tired of probing and gave up.
As the old timer’s passed on this story was mostly forgotten.
Franklin “Frank” Rockefeller (1845-1917) enlisted at 16-years-old into the Union army during the time of Civil War.
As a private with Company A of the 7th Ohio Infantry, he was wounded twice; the second wound effectively ended his military service.



What Happened to the Library of Alexandria?

By Jennifer Renson
From page 19 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Once known as the greatest Library in the Ancient World, the Royal Library of Alexandria (the city founded by Alexander the Great) contained volumes of books from different and scattered parts of the ancient world, a treasure trove of historic proportions.
The remnants that were discovered in 2004 by a Polish-Egyptian excavation team provide small insight to the magnitude of greatness the Royal Library once had.
The interesting aspects about the Royal Library are not in its creation, but with its (devastating) destruction.
The mystery of its demise has spawned several theories and culprits with just as much evidential information to support them.



State Treasures - Texas

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 47 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Cached & Forgotten Treasure
at the Apache Post Office
HUDSPETH COUNTY - Gambler Red Crenshaw was the only passenger on the stage when it pulled out of the Eagle Springs station carrying a large shipment of gold coins to the banks in El Paso.
He rode in the box talking with his friend, the stage driver, a man named Morgan.
The two were longtime friends and discussed their plan to hijack the gold shipment.
The plan was to kill the mules, ransack the stage to make it look like an Apache ambush, and then take off with the gold.
Though most Apache’s had left the region, there remained some rebel bands whose depredations well outnumbered their warriors.



What Happened to the Library of Alexandria?

By Jennifer Renson
From page 19 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Once known as the greatest Library in the Ancient World, the Royal Library of Alexandria (the city founded by Alexander the Great) contained volumes of books from different and scattered parts of the ancient world, a treasure trove of historic proportions.
The remnants that were discovered in 2004 by a Polish-Egyptian excavation team provide small insight to the magnitude of greatness the Royal Library once had.
The interesting aspects about the Royal Library are not in its creation, but with its (devastating) destruction.
The mystery of its demise has spawned several theories and culprits with just as much evidential information to support them.



Finding Treasure With A Detector

By John Christopher Fine
From page 59 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When I was learning to fly a plane I resisted putting complete reliance on instruments. I tried to second-guess the compass, turn and bank indicator, and artificial horizon.
It is natural enough to rely on visual clues since I was flying in daylight. Eventually, as I became a better pilot, I relied on the instruments.
The same can be said about treasure detecting with a Pulse Induction instrument. Early on I doubted the signals. If the dig was too arduous I gave up, attributing the signal to some fault in the detector.
Metal detectors have advanced dramatically since the advent of micro-chip computer technology.
I do a great deal of underwater detecting, some in areas where Spanish galleons have been wrecked in the fury of hurricanes.



Thirteen Gold Nuggets

By Geno Lawrenzi
From page 22 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Joe Wilcox could sure get a fellow’s attention.
We were having coffee and deep-dish apple pie at Bill Johnson’s, a popular restaurant on Van Buren Street in Phoenix, Arizona.
The place was owned by Bill Johnson, a colorful cowboy type who was famous for his “We don’t fool you, we feed you” breakfasts that featured thick-slabbed bacon, ham, Texas toast, and bottomless coffee served by cute, perky waitresses in cowgirl outfits and toting guns.
Wilcox and his family operated two Indian arts jewelry stores in Phoenix and Sedona.
I was working as a reporter for the Phoenix Gazette, a daily newspaper, and Joe and I had become friends after going on a mountain lion hunting excursion into the Superstition Mountains on horseback.



How To Mine For Diamonds…

By Andy Sabisch
From page 56 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Diamonds…the name alone has mystique all its own.
Besides being “a girl’s best friend,” one typically pictures diamonds being mined in some far-off, remote location under arduous conditions and then taking a tortuous path through the diamond cities of the world on the way to the local mall where they are put up for sale.
Being adventuresome by nature, treasure hunters may find themselves thinking about packing up and heading out in search of a patch of diamonds, but in reality, the old park, long forgotten battlefield or miner’s claim nearby is where we tend to escape the day-to-day rat race and seek our fortune.
So in that case you might ask, “Then what’s with the title of this article?”



State Treasures - Connecticut

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Guatmozin Treasure
(NEW HAVEN COUNTY) - Just a half mile off the coast east of Milford, Connecticut, sits 14-acre Charles Island, reputed to have been the depository of more than one noted treasure.
The island's history is shrouded in mystery, legend, and curses.
No one who’s ever lived on the island stayed very long after Ansantawea, chief of the local Paugussett tribe, sold it to early settlers in 1639.
Ansantawea had used the island as his summer home for years, but every enterprise undertaken on the island after 1639 is said to have ended in failure.
In the mid-1600's, a tobacco plantation located here, later a fish oil factory, a mansion, a hotel and religious retreat; all ended in failure for their owners.