What Happened to the Library of Alexandria?

By Jennifer Renson
From page 19 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Once known as the greatest Library in the Ancient World, the Royal Library of Alexandria (the city founded by Alexander the Great) contained volumes of books from different and scattered parts of the ancient world, a treasure trove of historic proportions.
The remnants that were discovered in 2004 by a Polish-Egyptian excavation team provide small insight to the magnitude of greatness the Royal Library once had.
The interesting aspects about the Royal Library are not in its creation, but with its (devastating) destruction.
The mystery of its demise has spawned several theories and culprits with just as much evidential information to support them.



State Treasures - Texas

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 47 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Cached & Forgotten Treasure
at the Apache Post Office
HUDSPETH COUNTY - Gambler Red Crenshaw was the only passenger on the stage when it pulled out of the Eagle Springs station carrying a large shipment of gold coins to the banks in El Paso.
He rode in the box talking with his friend, the stage driver, a man named Morgan.
The two were longtime friends and discussed their plan to hijack the gold shipment.
The plan was to kill the mules, ransack the stage to make it look like an Apache ambush, and then take off with the gold.
Though most Apache’s had left the region, there remained some rebel bands whose depredations well outnumbered their warriors.



What Happened to the Library of Alexandria?

By Jennifer Renson
From page 19 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Once known as the greatest Library in the Ancient World, the Royal Library of Alexandria (the city founded by Alexander the Great) contained volumes of books from different and scattered parts of the ancient world, a treasure trove of historic proportions.
The remnants that were discovered in 2004 by a Polish-Egyptian excavation team provide small insight to the magnitude of greatness the Royal Library once had.
The interesting aspects about the Royal Library are not in its creation, but with its (devastating) destruction.
The mystery of its demise has spawned several theories and culprits with just as much evidential information to support them.



Finding Treasure With A Detector

By John Christopher Fine
From page 59 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When I was learning to fly a plane I resisted putting complete reliance on instruments. I tried to second-guess the compass, turn and bank indicator, and artificial horizon.
It is natural enough to rely on visual clues since I was flying in daylight. Eventually, as I became a better pilot, I relied on the instruments.
The same can be said about treasure detecting with a Pulse Induction instrument. Early on I doubted the signals. If the dig was too arduous I gave up, attributing the signal to some fault in the detector.
Metal detectors have advanced dramatically since the advent of micro-chip computer technology.
I do a great deal of underwater detecting, some in areas where Spanish galleons have been wrecked in the fury of hurricanes.



Thirteen Gold Nuggets

By Geno Lawrenzi
From page 22 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Joe Wilcox could sure get a fellow’s attention.
We were having coffee and deep-dish apple pie at Bill Johnson’s, a popular restaurant on Van Buren Street in Phoenix, Arizona.
The place was owned by Bill Johnson, a colorful cowboy type who was famous for his “We don’t fool you, we feed you” breakfasts that featured thick-slabbed bacon, ham, Texas toast, and bottomless coffee served by cute, perky waitresses in cowgirl outfits and toting guns.
Wilcox and his family operated two Indian arts jewelry stores in Phoenix and Sedona.
I was working as a reporter for the Phoenix Gazette, a daily newspaper, and Joe and I had become friends after going on a mountain lion hunting excursion into the Superstition Mountains on horseback.



How To Mine For Diamonds…

By Andy Sabisch
From page 56 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Diamonds…the name alone has mystique all its own.
Besides being “a girl’s best friend,” one typically pictures diamonds being mined in some far-off, remote location under arduous conditions and then taking a tortuous path through the diamond cities of the world on the way to the local mall where they are put up for sale.
Being adventuresome by nature, treasure hunters may find themselves thinking about packing up and heading out in search of a patch of diamonds, but in reality, the old park, long forgotten battlefield or miner’s claim nearby is where we tend to escape the day-to-day rat race and seek our fortune.
So in that case you might ask, “Then what’s with the title of this article?”



State Treasures - Connecticut

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Guatmozin Treasure
(NEW HAVEN COUNTY) - Just a half mile off the coast east of Milford, Connecticut, sits 14-acre Charles Island, reputed to have been the depository of more than one noted treasure.
The island's history is shrouded in mystery, legend, and curses.
No one who’s ever lived on the island stayed very long after Ansantawea, chief of the local Paugussett tribe, sold it to early settlers in 1639.
Ansantawea had used the island as his summer home for years, but every enterprise undertaken on the island after 1639 is said to have ended in failure.
In the mid-1600's, a tobacco plantation located here, later a fish oil factory, a mansion, a hotel and religious retreat; all ended in failure for their owners.



How To Mine For Diamonds…

By Andy Sabisch
From page 56 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Diamonds…the name alone has mystique all its own.
Besides being “a girl’s best friend,” one typically pictures diamonds being mined in some far-off, remote location under arduous conditions and then taking a tortuous path through the diamond cities of the world on the way to the local mall where they are put up for sale. 
Being adventuresome by nature, treasure hunters may find themselves thinking about packing up and heading out in search of a patch of diamonds, but in reality, the old park, long forgotten battlefield or miner’s claim nearby is where we tend to escape the day-to-day rat race and seek our fortune. 
So in that case you might ask, “Then what’s with the title of this article?”



How To: A Treasure Trove of Treasure Sites

By Jerry Eckhart
From page 6 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From one day to the next it seems that someone calls or visits with one question in mind.
That question is invariably the same.
Where do you find all your places to treasure hunt?
In the past, I have skirted around the question, giving rather vague answers.
I figured that anyone who is interested in finding coins, relics or treasure should have enough gumption to find their own locations.
It seems I was wrong, because most beginning treasure hunters do not have enough experience to think outside of the treasure box.
They read a number of books and magazines and only get the tip of the iceberg as far as finding worthwhile sites are concerned.



Small and Large Coins From the Past

By Rocky McIntosh
From page 32 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


After my friend let me try out his Garrett metal detector and I found my grandmother’s treasure, I have yearned to have a Garrett detector of my own.
My old metal detector gave her heart and soul to find treasure for many years, but now she is in need of repair. So I have replaced her with a Garrett Ace 350 and it is the best move I have ever made found.
When I take my Garrett Ace 350 metal detector to all the vanished house sites that date back to the 1800’s to hunt for treasure, and my Garrett Ace 350 detector zeros in on all the single small coins, it makes me feel like a rich man.    
Throughout many years of treasure hunting in my life, I have learned by trial and error that treasures that consist of large coins are very elusive.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 47 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Would it be possible to get the address and name of the current owner of Oak
Island?
I have an inexpensive way to find the treasure; the current owners
have not had any luck for over 200 years, so what do they have to
loose (sic) by hearing me out?
Thanks,
Al Petrulis, The Bottleman
Via http://www.losttreasure.com/contact



The Old Prospector and the Cowboy

By Jane Alene Boyles
From page 36 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


After my friend let me try out his Garrett metal detector and I found my grandmother’s treasure, I have yearned to have a Garrett detector of my own.
My old metal detector gave her heart and soul to find treasure for many years, but now she is in need of repair. So I have replaced her with a Garrett Ace 350 and it is the best move I have ever made found.
When I take my Garrett Ace 350 metal detector to all the vanished house sites that date back to the 1800’s to hunt for treasure, and my Garrett Ace 350 detector zeros in on all the single small coins, it makes me feel like a rich man.    
Throughout many years of treasure hunting in my life, I have learned by trial and error that treasures that consist of large coins are very elusive.



Staying Warm and Toasty

By John Minges
From page 62 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For those that love the great outdoors nothing can dampen spirits more than being bone chilling cold.
We all want to experience a great time hunting for treasure. For some this means swinging the detector or for others it’s digging in the dirt for the elusive yellow metal. Maybe it is both for you!
Regardless, nothing compares to breathing in the fresh air and being in the great outdoors to renew both the spirit and the mind!
When the temperature drops you know adventure still awaits you. I’ve got a few tips for you from the folks who know how to keep warm, because they spend their time in Antarctica!



State Treasures - Delaware

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 39 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Treasure of Blueskin
(SUSSEX COUNTY) Pirates began appearing on the Atlantic seaboard as early as 1685 and they satisfied themselves with occasional sallies, caused little damage, and were generally non-violent.
But two years later Atlantic waters had become more competitive and pirates had become more formidable.
Violent attacks on coastal towns and ships at sea were so frequent and devastating to trade and livelihood that the government in England was forced to act.
The small costal village of Lewes would become a busy port, as Lewes harbor was known for its calm waters.
Pirates laid siege to the town in 1690 and again in 1698.



Confederate Treasure in Marietta

By Kelly B. Darmofal
From page 42 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you’re planning to visit Atlanta, Georgia, one of the South’s largest cities, be sure to pack a shovel!
Approximately 15 miles northwest of this city lays Marietta, and within or close to this city’s limits lies a multi-million dollar hidden treasure cache simply waiting to be found.
This hidden bounty is comprised of gold and silver coins, priceless pieces of jewelry, and gold and silver bullion.
The city of Marietta offers a diverse blend of small-town values with big-city opportunities, while preserving its rich and intriguing history.
There are numerous museums, galleries, exhibits and boutiques, as well as over 30 diverse and enticing restaurants. A person is not likely to run out of things to do.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 47 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Would it be possible to get the address and name of the current owner of Oak
Island?
I have an inexpensive way to find the treasure; the current owners
have not had any luck for over 200 years, so what do they have to
loose (sic) by hearing me out?

Thanks,
Al Petrulis, The Bottleman
Via http://www.losttreasure.com/contact



State Treasures - Virginia

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 50 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure Lost on Snow Hill Farm
FAQUIER COUNTY - Scotsman William Kirk is reputed to have been a pirate in his early years.
During the late 1760's, Kirk retired from his seafaring life and purchased the Snow Hill Farm, a tract of almost 400 acres roughly one mile south of New Baltimore.
Kirk and his wife took residence in their home amidst local rumors that Kirk had been a pirate and had buried $60,000 in silver and gold somewhere on his property.
In 1779, Kirk died without telling his wife where his fortune was buried.
Having failed to locate the cache ,and unable to run the farm alone, Mrs. Kirk sold the farm to Colonel William Edmonds.



Mystery of the Frank Gabriel Blacksmith Shop

By Andrew Hind
From page 53 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The air is thick with smoke and the scent of burning coals. The heat of the forge’s fire is almost oppressive.
The incessant ringing of hammer on anvil, literally banging metal into a new form, taxes even the most robust of men.
There’s no doubt about it; blacksmithing is a young, fit man’s vocation.
And yet Novar-native Frank Gabriel continued his trade well into his advanced years, and despite being near-crippled with arthritis.
Gabriel was an impressive man and it’s fitting that his blacksmith shop has been recreated among the dozen authentically restored buildings on display at Muskoka Heritage Place.
Here, a spiritual descendent of Gabriel, modern-day smith D.J. Brown, carries on the memory and trade of Frank Gabriel.



Tools of the Trade - Digging Up History at Mine Run

By Chris Gholson
From page 56 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was a humid day and the shady spot I found near the forest’s edge was the perfect place to take a break.
From this vantage point I had a clear view of the grassy fields below. It was high ground and would have been a strategic spot to hunker do
I tried to envision what this same plot of land would have looked like 149 years ago.
I closed my eyes and let the present slip away.
The more I relax, the easier it is to zone out the background noises until eventually all I hear are the sounds of the leaves rustling above.
Then the seemingly perfect calm is broken by the whinny of a horse in the distance.
Seconds later the world erupts with a violent cavalcade of gunfire.



How To: A Treasure Trove of Treasure Sites

By Jerry Eckhart
From page 6 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From one day to the next it seems that someone calls or visits with one question in mind.
That question is invariably the same.
Where do you find all your places to treasure hunt?
In the past, I have skirted around the question, giving rather vague answers.
I figured that anyone who is interested in finding coins, relics or treasure should have enough gumption to find their own locations. 
It seems I was wrong, because most beginning treasure hunters do not have enough experience to think outside of the treasure box.
They read a number of books and magazines and only get the tip of the iceberg as far as finding worthwhile sites are concerned.