State Treasures - Florida

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 39 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Treasure of Bird Key
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY - Research of old land deeds and maps will be needed to help locate this treasure site.
Not wanting to confuse the locale, I will quote directly from treasure researcher and author James R. Keel’s own text.
Keel wrote three books on lost treasures in Florida between 1978 and 1981.
He also wrote for treasure hunting publications; the details of this story appeared in Treasure magazine, date unknown. The story goes...
In the late 1880’s, Ned Pent filed a homestead claim of "40 acres in section 19, just south of the Saunders homestead.
"The property was either part of, or right next to, a strip of land known as the ‘Gleason Mile,’ owned by the Gleason family.



Tools of the Trade - Specialization & Practice Pay Off

By Andy Sabisch
From page 44 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This month’s column is intended to provide some “food for thought” and help readers formulate a plan of attack for 2013 so that one’s finds meet or exceed expectations. 
Over the decades that I have been involved in the hobby, I consistently run into two groups of treasure hunters at shows, seminars, hunts or club meetings.
The first includes those that have the passion and are excited about getting out for some hunting, yet never seem to bring home those landmark finds that show up on the find table or appear in posts online with any degree of consistency. 
Sure, there is the occasional “lucky find” that turns up, but they are not unearthed with any regularity. 



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 47 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Can I use a regular coin rapped (sic) in gold leaf to simulate a gold coin for training? Will the test coin sound like a real gold coin? I use a Tesoro LBST. 
Thanks,
Doug Anderson



Idaho Mine Treasures

By Art Redman
From page 6 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Hughes Mine
Over the years, two prospectors named Hughes and Swan journeyed every spring into the mountains of the upper Salmon River district of central Idaho and returned in the fall with large quantities of raw gold.
They were the envy of everyone who ever prospected for gold. The pair eluded all pursuers and the location of the rich golden quartz vein remained a secret.
During the fall, prospector Hughes fell ill leaving Swan the task to return to their mine.
Traveling alone in the spring, Swan by himself was an easier target for bushwhackers.
He was robbed and murdered in the mountains of central Idaho. 



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 47 of the February, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Can I use a regular coin rapped (sic) in gold leaf to simulate a gold coin for training? Will the test coin sound like a real gold coin? I use a Tesoro LBST. 
Thanks,
Doug Anderson



Rockefeller's Buried Treasure

By The Hangman
From page 16 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


KIOWA COUNTY, KS – After researching this story for Lost Treasure, I believe this treasure remains buried in Kansas and with additional research could be recovered.
When the events connected to this story occurred, residents living around Belvidere did search for this hoard with probes.
It was before the advent of the metal detector and, over time, residents got tired of probing and gave up.
As the old timer’s passed on this story was mostly forgotten.
Franklin “Frank” Rockefeller (1845-1917) enlisted at 16-years-old into the Union army during the time of Civil War.
As a private with Company A of the 7th Ohio Infantry, he was wounded twice; the second wound effectively ended his military service.



What Happened to the Library of Alexandria?

By Jennifer Renson
From page 19 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Once known as the greatest Library in the Ancient World, the Royal Library of Alexandria (the city founded by Alexander the Great) contained volumes of books from different and scattered parts of the ancient world, a treasure trove of historic proportions.
The remnants that were discovered in 2004 by a Polish-Egyptian excavation team provide small insight to the magnitude of greatness the Royal Library once had.
The interesting aspects about the Royal Library are not in its creation, but with its (devastating) destruction.
The mystery of its demise has spawned several theories and culprits with just as much evidential information to support them.



State Treasures - Texas

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 47 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Cached & Forgotten Treasure
at the Apache Post Office
HUDSPETH COUNTY - Gambler Red Crenshaw was the only passenger on the stage when it pulled out of the Eagle Springs station carrying a large shipment of gold coins to the banks in El Paso.
He rode in the box talking with his friend, the stage driver, a man named Morgan.
The two were longtime friends and discussed their plan to hijack the gold shipment.
The plan was to kill the mules, ransack the stage to make it look like an Apache ambush, and then take off with the gold.
Though most Apache’s had left the region, there remained some rebel bands whose depredations well outnumbered their warriors.



What Happened to the Library of Alexandria?

By Jennifer Renson
From page 19 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Once known as the greatest Library in the Ancient World, the Royal Library of Alexandria (the city founded by Alexander the Great) contained volumes of books from different and scattered parts of the ancient world, a treasure trove of historic proportions.
The remnants that were discovered in 2004 by a Polish-Egyptian excavation team provide small insight to the magnitude of greatness the Royal Library once had.
The interesting aspects about the Royal Library are not in its creation, but with its (devastating) destruction.
The mystery of its demise has spawned several theories and culprits with just as much evidential information to support them.



Finding Treasure With A Detector

By John Christopher Fine
From page 59 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When I was learning to fly a plane I resisted putting complete reliance on instruments. I tried to second-guess the compass, turn and bank indicator, and artificial horizon.
It is natural enough to rely on visual clues since I was flying in daylight. Eventually, as I became a better pilot, I relied on the instruments.
The same can be said about treasure detecting with a Pulse Induction instrument. Early on I doubted the signals. If the dig was too arduous I gave up, attributing the signal to some fault in the detector.
Metal detectors have advanced dramatically since the advent of micro-chip computer technology.
I do a great deal of underwater detecting, some in areas where Spanish galleons have been wrecked in the fury of hurricanes.



Thirteen Gold Nuggets

By Geno Lawrenzi
From page 22 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Joe Wilcox could sure get a fellow’s attention.
We were having coffee and deep-dish apple pie at Bill Johnson’s, a popular restaurant on Van Buren Street in Phoenix, Arizona.
The place was owned by Bill Johnson, a colorful cowboy type who was famous for his “We don’t fool you, we feed you” breakfasts that featured thick-slabbed bacon, ham, Texas toast, and bottomless coffee served by cute, perky waitresses in cowgirl outfits and toting guns.
Wilcox and his family operated two Indian arts jewelry stores in Phoenix and Sedona.
I was working as a reporter for the Phoenix Gazette, a daily newspaper, and Joe and I had become friends after going on a mountain lion hunting excursion into the Superstition Mountains on horseback.



How To Mine For Diamonds…

By Andy Sabisch
From page 56 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Diamonds…the name alone has mystique all its own.
Besides being “a girl’s best friend,” one typically pictures diamonds being mined in some far-off, remote location under arduous conditions and then taking a tortuous path through the diamond cities of the world on the way to the local mall where they are put up for sale.
Being adventuresome by nature, treasure hunters may find themselves thinking about packing up and heading out in search of a patch of diamonds, but in reality, the old park, long forgotten battlefield or miner’s claim nearby is where we tend to escape the day-to-day rat race and seek our fortune.
So in that case you might ask, “Then what’s with the title of this article?”



State Treasures - Connecticut

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Guatmozin Treasure
(NEW HAVEN COUNTY) - Just a half mile off the coast east of Milford, Connecticut, sits 14-acre Charles Island, reputed to have been the depository of more than one noted treasure.
The island's history is shrouded in mystery, legend, and curses.
No one who’s ever lived on the island stayed very long after Ansantawea, chief of the local Paugussett tribe, sold it to early settlers in 1639.
Ansantawea had used the island as his summer home for years, but every enterprise undertaken on the island after 1639 is said to have ended in failure.
In the mid-1600's, a tobacco plantation located here, later a fish oil factory, a mansion, a hotel and religious retreat; all ended in failure for their owners.



How To Mine For Diamonds…

By Andy Sabisch
From page 56 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Diamonds…the name alone has mystique all its own.
Besides being “a girl’s best friend,” one typically pictures diamonds being mined in some far-off, remote location under arduous conditions and then taking a tortuous path through the diamond cities of the world on the way to the local mall where they are put up for sale. 
Being adventuresome by nature, treasure hunters may find themselves thinking about packing up and heading out in search of a patch of diamonds, but in reality, the old park, long forgotten battlefield or miner’s claim nearby is where we tend to escape the day-to-day rat race and seek our fortune. 
So in that case you might ask, “Then what’s with the title of this article?”



How To: A Treasure Trove of Treasure Sites

By Jerry Eckhart
From page 6 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From one day to the next it seems that someone calls or visits with one question in mind.
That question is invariably the same.
Where do you find all your places to treasure hunt?
In the past, I have skirted around the question, giving rather vague answers.
I figured that anyone who is interested in finding coins, relics or treasure should have enough gumption to find their own locations.
It seems I was wrong, because most beginning treasure hunters do not have enough experience to think outside of the treasure box.
They read a number of books and magazines and only get the tip of the iceberg as far as finding worthwhile sites are concerned.



Small and Large Coins From the Past

By Rocky McIntosh
From page 32 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


After my friend let me try out his Garrett metal detector and I found my grandmother’s treasure, I have yearned to have a Garrett detector of my own.
My old metal detector gave her heart and soul to find treasure for many years, but now she is in need of repair. So I have replaced her with a Garrett Ace 350 and it is the best move I have ever made found.
When I take my Garrett Ace 350 metal detector to all the vanished house sites that date back to the 1800’s to hunt for treasure, and my Garrett Ace 350 detector zeros in on all the single small coins, it makes me feel like a rich man.    
Throughout many years of treasure hunting in my life, I have learned by trial and error that treasures that consist of large coins are very elusive.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 47 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Would it be possible to get the address and name of the current owner of Oak
Island?
I have an inexpensive way to find the treasure; the current owners
have not had any luck for over 200 years, so what do they have to
loose (sic) by hearing me out?
Thanks,
Al Petrulis, The Bottleman
Via http://www.losttreasure.com/contact



The Old Prospector and the Cowboy

By Jane Alene Boyles
From page 36 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


After my friend let me try out his Garrett metal detector and I found my grandmother’s treasure, I have yearned to have a Garrett detector of my own.
My old metal detector gave her heart and soul to find treasure for many years, but now she is in need of repair. So I have replaced her with a Garrett Ace 350 and it is the best move I have ever made found.
When I take my Garrett Ace 350 metal detector to all the vanished house sites that date back to the 1800’s to hunt for treasure, and my Garrett Ace 350 detector zeros in on all the single small coins, it makes me feel like a rich man.    
Throughout many years of treasure hunting in my life, I have learned by trial and error that treasures that consist of large coins are very elusive.



Staying Warm and Toasty

By John Minges
From page 62 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For those that love the great outdoors nothing can dampen spirits more than being bone chilling cold.
We all want to experience a great time hunting for treasure. For some this means swinging the detector or for others it’s digging in the dirt for the elusive yellow metal. Maybe it is both for you!
Regardless, nothing compares to breathing in the fresh air and being in the great outdoors to renew both the spirit and the mind!
When the temperature drops you know adventure still awaits you. I’ve got a few tips for you from the folks who know how to keep warm, because they spend their time in Antarctica!



State Treasures - Delaware

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 39 of the January, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Treasure of Blueskin
(SUSSEX COUNTY) Pirates began appearing on the Atlantic seaboard as early as 1685 and they satisfied themselves with occasional sallies, caused little damage, and were generally non-violent.
But two years later Atlantic waters had become more competitive and pirates had become more formidable.
Violent attacks on coastal towns and ships at sea were so frequent and devastating to trade and livelihood that the government in England was forced to act.
The small costal village of Lewes would become a busy port, as Lewes harbor was known for its calm waters.
Pirates laid siege to the town in 1690 and again in 1698.