They're Digging Again At Oak Island

By R. L. Fynney
From page 17 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Hunched like an enigmatic question mark fifty-four miles off the southern coast of Nova Scotia lies a tiny speck of land known as Oak Island, its shape appropriately hewn by nature. Oak Island has been shrouded in mystery for more than a century and a half.

Reports of eerie, flickering lights sighted by ships passing in the night, and strangely garbed figures seen moving about on its shores, are included in its history. But the island is most famous as the legendary site of one of the most fabled, most sought-after, and most perfectly guarded treasures in the world.



Find Diamonds And Emeralds In North Carolina

By Sally A. Perkins
From page 19 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


During the last half of the 19th century, prospectors panning for gold in North Carolina occasionally found diamonds in their gold pans. So many diamonds were found, quite by accident, in the southern Piedmont area that it is suspected there was an undiscovered diamond pipe somewhere nearby. About a dozen diamonds were known to have been picked upand there is no telling how many were tossed aside by unknowing prospectors.

The American Museum of Natural History has one of the finest of these diamonds, a lustrous, flawless one of 4.33 carats. A canary yellow crystal came from Cleveland County, and a green-tinted diamond was found in Lincoln County.



Lost Gold On The Rio Grande

By J. G. Rountree
From page 20 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Bill Kelly was an itinerant cowboy of mixed parentage, being half Negro and half Seminole Indian. Illiterate and thought by his employers to be somewhat dull witted; he seemed to have none of the characteristics which would lead to fame. Yet his name will always be known where stories of lost mines are told, for Bill Kelly was the original discoverer of what came to be known as the Lost Nigger Mine.

It must be understood that the name was applied well before the turn of the century, and there is no ethnic significance in the name. It is simply the only one by which the lost mine is known.



Lost Tennessee Hoard

By John Howard
From page 26 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was well known around Hillsboro, in Coffee County, Tennessee, that Cefe Wenten didnt believe in banks. And it was no secret that he placed his money in nail kegs, which he hid on his farm.

It was in 1864 when the Brixie gang, then roaming and plundering this area, heard of the farmers miserliness and the fortune that he reputedly had hidden. They forced their way into his home one evening and demanded to know where the money had been buried.

Like many other misers, Wentens money was more precious to him than his life. The outlaws hanged him without his revealing his secret caches. The gang then tortured his wife and children. But they, too, martyred themselves for the treasureall were found shot to death.

No cache was found by the outlaws.



Ghost Ship Treasure

By Comdr. Richard S. Brownes
From page 27 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was no easy task to find what we believe to be the historical wreck of famous French explorer Cavalier Sieur de LaSalles 40-ton shallop Griffon, more commonly referred to as the Ghost Ship of the Great Lakes. Indeed, the whims of lady luck played a very important role in the entire salvage operation, combined with a determined crew that labored diligently for many days.

All of this enabled us to discover the Griffons remains, located in 40 feet of water, which was lost on the reefs near Birch Island in the North Channel of Lake Huron.



Treasure On Cape Cod

By Wilson David Flanders
From page 15 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1831 a fisherman named Arthur Doane found a fortune in Spanish gold on Cape Cod. He kept his treasure secret for forty-nine years, and then, on his deathbed, told a friend.

But his friend did not recover all of the treasure. Most of it is still buried somewhere in the silvery sand of Cape Cod, not far from old Chatham Light, where a few scattered gold coins have been found. Perhaps, some day, a treasure hunter with a metal detector will uncover the six remaining bags of gold coins.

It happened like this:

In 1831 Arthur Doane was working on a banker (a small fishing schooner) out of Chatham, Massachusetts. At the time, young Doane was going with a girl in Chatham with whom he could never seem to spend enough time.



Yankee Jim's Lost Gold

By Ben T. Traywick
From page 17 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the spring of 1848, the sleepy little town of Yerba Buena (now San Francisco) came wide awake when the cry of Gold! Gold in California! was heard.

The rush to the mountains and ravines began. Many of the rough sailors on trading ships lying in the port jumped ship and joined in the rush. One such sailor was a tall, skinny individual from Maine. His name has long been forgotten, but be will live forever in Mother Lode history as Yankee Jim.



Treasure Wreck!

By Burt D. Webber, Jr.
From page 22 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Of all the sunken treasures lost on remote reefs throughout the Caribbean, none has been more frequently sought than that of the reputed wreck of the 18th century Spanish frigate Nuestra Senora del Carmen, more commonly known as the Genovesa. This wreck lies somewhere on one of the many reefs forming the Pedro Bank, 100 miles southwest of the Island of Jamaica.

The Genovesa has long been the target of treasure hunting expeditions, some of them well publicized, while others have been unknown. Expeditions have ranged from mere adventuring to the most thoroughly equipped and well-organized groups representing substantial investments.



Lost Black Mountain Gold

By John Howard
From page 30 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the 1860s, two prospectors were working a rich gold mine somewhere west of Fort Collins, Colorado. History has forgotten their last names. They were known only as Hans and Mike. One day they quarreled, and Mike killed Hans.

The gold claim the two men had worked was somewhere west of Fort Collins, up the Cache la Poudre, in the Shining Mountains. Soldiers at the fort thought they could scare Mike into revealing the mines location by threatening to hang him for killing his partner. But they apparently strung him up too long, for the mock hanging backfired and Mike lay dead, too.

In 1899 a small boy was lost in the mountains. When he found his way home, he told of staying at an abandoned cabin high in the mountains where interesting, shining rocks lay on the table.



Utah's Most Fabulous Treasure

By Al Masters
From page 34 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was in the summer of 1914 that Freddie Crystal first showed up at Oscar Robinsons ranch at Kanab, Utah. For some reason Robinson, owner of one of the oldest ranches in Kane County, hired the sun-baked old saddle tramp, although it was apparent from the beginning that Crystal would be worth little as a cowhand.

Most of the time old Freddie spent fiddling around with the neighborhood kids, telling them tales about the Spaniard Cortez and his armor-clad conquistadores. Other times he would tell his favorite story of how Montezumas men had brought a fabulous treasure out of Mexico to hide it somewhere in the western United States.



Missing Oklahoma Gold

By Steve Wilson
From page 39 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Civil War in the Indian Territory of what is now the state of Oklahoma was devastating and tragic. The Indians of the Five Civilized Tribes were forced to fend for themselves, as the Federal Government had removed its troops, leaving the land to be overrun by outlaws and renegades. And that the lawless region was infested by a brutal breed of bandits is well known.

At the beginning of the war, Philip Usray lived at Sallisaw, in the densely timbered hills of present Sequoyah County. He was neutral in his feelings and wished to avoid involvement with either side in the conflict, but, he had horses and mules which the Union forces needed badly, and since they could pay in gold, Usray sold them his stock.



Midwest Ghost Towns

By Chuck Zehnder
From page 40 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It looked like an old road. I had passed it many times on the highway running north of town, but had never really paid any attention to it. Now that I had noticed the road, I was curious to see if it led to Calhoun, Iowa, a town which had been dead for more than half a century.

My ghost-towning had begun in the upper Midwest in 1963, after I had been discharged from the army and had entered the University of South Dakota in Vermilion. It began because of a bet. One of my friends had bet me a $10 bill that there were no ghost towns in the county. Since I will do just about anything for $10, I accepted the challenge and headed for the W. H. Over Museum library.



Lost Texas Lead Mine

By George B. Hamilton
From page 59 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For generations, stories have been told of a lost lead mine near Brookeland, Texas. Brookeland is in Sabine County, in extreme East Texas, and the mines location, according to differing versions, could be on either of three creeksMcKim Creek, Rock Creek or Beef Creek.

It is recorded that Sabine County is the only area in this vicinity in which lead has been listed as a resource. Small amounts of low-grade ore have been found in northern sections of Sabine County, but very little of it has been mined. Some of the countys early settlers are known to have mined an almost pure lead ore in the southern region, and it is here that the lost major lead mine is believed to be located.



Delaware's Jinxed Treasure Ship

By Al Masters
From page 13 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On Delaware Bay, 104 miles south of the bustling city of Wilmington, Delaware, is the little town of Lewes in Sussex County. If you should travel to Lewes and go to the old graveyard there, located by St. Peters Episcopal Church on the west corner of Second and Market Street, you will find an old tombstone bearing the following inscription:

Here Rest The Remains Of Captain James Drew Who Commanded His Britannic Majestys Sloop Of War deBraak In Which He Lost His Life When She Foundered At The Capes of Delaware The 10th of June, 1798. He Was Beloved For His Virtues And Admired For His Bravery His Affectionate Relict Has Erected This Monument To Perpetuate His Memory



Mississippi's Missing Barrels Of Gold

By Leonard P. Kiedrowski
From page 20 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Near a home on the banks of Catahoula Creek in Mississippi lie three barrels of gold, the location of which has baffled treasure hunters of the area for 125 years. It is the bandit loot of the Copeland gang, and it is buried near the city of Pearlington, a few miles from the fabulous Gold Coast of the Gulf of Mexico.

The story of these barrels of treasure is somewhat complex. Although the existence of the treasure is verified by many old citizens whose parents knew of the robber gang, the actual location of the huge cache of loot may be farther north, near the old Gainesvile area. If this is true, it is probably within the boundaries of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) complex, which would make it strictly off limits for treasure hunters.



Lost Arkansas Silver Mine

By Jacques Tisserand
From page 23 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In Boone County, Arkansas, there is an old Spanish silver mine on a mountain that now waits to be found for the third time. It happened this way:

In 1880, near what is now the community of Batavia in Boone County, the proprietor of Reas General Store sat with his sons at the supper table and listened to a story told in broken English by an old man who apparently was of Spanish descent.

Earlier, the old man had meekly asked for food and a place to sleep. After having been kindly cared for by Rea, he may, have told his story as a means of repaying the storekeepers generosity. Whatever his motives, the old man laid out a weathered map on the table and with a gnarled forefinger he pointed out a symbol which be interpreted as Pilot Knob.



Oklahoma's Missing Army Payroll

By Steve Wilson
From page 24 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1885, a regular stage and freight route was established between Henrietta, Texas, and Fort Sill, Oklahoma, then in the Kiowa-Comanche-Apache country of Indian Territory.

The stage made periodic trips to the fort, carrying soldiers, dignitaries and their wives, Indian agents, mail, and occasionally the government payroll.

In good weather the trip took a full day. It was shortly after this route had opened that the stage company contracted to transport $96,000 in gold to Fort Sill, nestled in the foothills of the rugged Wichita Mountains, to be paid to the soldiers.



Town Of Little Treasures

By T. W. Paterson
From page 26 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you are a serious treasure hunter who will settle for the little treasures, then Cumberland, British Columbia, is the place for you.

Unlike legendary lost mines, you dont have to brave mountain wilds or desert heat to make your finds in Cumberlands Chinatown. There are no yellowed, hand-drawn maps to get you lostattractive road maps printed by the provincial government show the way quite clearly.



Treasure Thorough A Keyhole

By Gerald T. Ahnert
From page 31 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Some of my very best finds while treasure hunting have been made as the result of my trying, possibly with some success, to understand the habits and actions of people. But, being an adult, I found that I had thought only in adult terms. A recent discovery taught me that sometimes I must also think as a playing child.

A house in Oregon in which my wife and I rented an apartment was built in the 1890s. Some of the inside doors were equipped with locks that could be operated by skeleton keys. I wanted to make the house more secure, so I tried to lock the hail door with an old skeleton key.



Treasure At Castle Cap

By Jeff W. Henderson
From page 37 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The narrow walls of Castle Gap in far west Texas, east of U.S. Highway 385 between Crane and McCamey, hold many stories of hidden treasures that have never been found. The most famous of these concerns the fabulous treasure of Maximilian, Napoleon IIIs puppet emperor of Mexico, who was deposed and shot by Mexican revolutionists in 1867. According to this story, Maximilian attempted to send his fortune in gold and jewels out of Mexico before escaping himself, but a group of ex-Confederate soldiers murdered the wagoneers and guards and cached the treasure somewhere in Castle Gap.