Stranded!

By Lt. Lloyd L. Duncan
From page 39 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The desert may be likened to an enchantress. At times an ethereal beauty, she may at any moment become a deadly and unforgiving enemy. The unexpecteda stalled or stuck vehicle, a broken leg, or merely an empty canteenmay leave you at the mercy of this deadly enchantress.

Recently, a young man died just one mile from a well-traveled highway in the desert area near Californias Salton Sea, while searching for The Lost Gold of San Feipe Creek, which appeared in the July, 1970 issue of Treasure World.

A copy of the magazine, with portions of the article underlined, was found near the body.



Strange Markings Clues To A Lost Treasure

By Roscoe Legresley
From page 41 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


About halfway between the towns of Kooskia and Kamiah, Idaho, along the banks of the Clearwater River (which parallels Highway 12), there are markings that have created much conjecture over the years.

These consist of symbols painted on the faces of huge rocks in the manner of petrographs, similar to those Indians used in olden times to mark a spot or leave a message. Along with them, however, are some carvings which were put there before the paintings. Many questions as to the origin and meaning of these markings have been asked of the Nez Perce Indians, but none of them, not even the tribal leader or elders, can decipher or read the strange symbols.



Treasure Hunting Aids

By Rita Simon
From page 47 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The first step in finding anything is looking in the right place. But how do you find the right place to look? The science of archaeology has for many years enlisted the aid of aerial photography. Pictures taken from a balloon as early as 1909 revealed the plan of the ancient Roman port of Ostia.

The English pioneered in interpreting vegetation marks, usually on military photographs, showing the presence and outline of buried ruins invisible to anyone on the ground. Where a ditch was 4ug in time past, disturbing the subsoil and increasing topsoil depth, the weeds or cultivated crops grow more luxuriantly. Where walls or foundations decrease the soil depth, the vegetation is sparse and lighter in color. These variations show clearly in aerial photographs.



Lost Gold In Mississippi

By Edward Allen Bishop
From page 59 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Dr. John N. Young, who lived and practiced medicine in Water Valley, Mississippi, during the Civil War, received word one day that a band of Federal troops was approaching the town.

The doctor immediately gathered up his considerable wealth in gold corns and, placing the money in an iron cook pot, buried the treasure in his yard.

A skirmish subsequently occurred between Union and Confederate forces near Water Valley, and a number of wounded Union soldiers were brought to Dr. Young for treatment. The doctor hesitated at first, fearing that his own people in the valley would harbor hard feelings against him because of his having treated the enemy wounded. Professional ethics won, however, and he did what he could for the injured Yankee soldiers.



Modern Prospecting

By George A. Thompson
From page 63 of the June, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Prospecting has come along way since the time when all a man needed was a pick and shovel. The easily found outcrops and veins of ore have all been located. Today, knowledge and equipment the old-timer never dreamed of are necessary to find new deposits.

The picture of an old, bearded prospector making his way across the desert by the side of his faithful burro is a romantic one which turns our thoughts to tales of buried treasure and lost ledges of gold. But if the old-timer hasnt struck it rich after all his years of searching, what chance do we have today?



Lost Texas Lead Mine

By George B. Hamilton
From page 59 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For generations, stories have been told of a lost lead mine near Brookeland, Texas. Brookeland is in Sabine County, in extreme East Texas, and the mines location, according to differing versions, could be on either of three creeksMcKim Creek, Rock Creek or Beef Creek.

It is recorded that Sabine County is the only area in this vicinity in which lead has been listed as a resource. Small amounts of low-grade ore have been found in northern sections of Sabine County, but very little of it has been mined. Some of the countys early settlers are known to have mined an almost pure lead ore in the southern region, and it is here that the lost major lead mine is believed to be located.



Treasure On Cape Cod

By Wilson David Flanders
From page 15 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1831 a fisherman named Arthur Doane found a fortune in Spanish gold on Cape Cod. He kept his treasure secret for forty-nine years, and then, on his deathbed, told a friend.

But his friend did not recover all of the treasure. Most of it is still buried somewhere in the silvery sand of Cape Cod, not far from old Chatham Light, where a few scattered gold coins have been found. Perhaps, some day, a treasure hunter with a metal detector will uncover the six remaining bags of gold coins.

It happened like this:

In 1831 Arthur Doane was working on a banker (a small fishing schooner) out of Chatham, Massachusetts. At the time, young Doane was going with a girl in Chatham with whom he could never seem to spend enough time.



Yankee Jim's Lost Gold

By Ben T. Traywick
From page 17 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the spring of 1848, the sleepy little town of Yerba Buena (now San Francisco) came wide awake when the cry of Gold! Gold in California! was heard.

The rush to the mountains and ravines began. Many of the rough sailors on trading ships lying in the port jumped ship and joined in the rush. One such sailor was a tall, skinny individual from Maine. His name has long been forgotten, but be will live forever in Mother Lode history as Yankee Jim.



Treasure Wreck!

By Burt D. Webber, Jr.
From page 22 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Of all the sunken treasures lost on remote reefs throughout the Caribbean, none has been more frequently sought than that of the reputed wreck of the 18th century Spanish frigate Nuestra Senora del Carmen, more commonly known as the Genovesa. This wreck lies somewhere on one of the many reefs forming the Pedro Bank, 100 miles southwest of the Island of Jamaica.

The Genovesa has long been the target of treasure hunting expeditions, some of them well publicized, while others have been unknown. Expeditions have ranged from mere adventuring to the most thoroughly equipped and well-organized groups representing substantial investments.



Lost Black Mountain Gold

By John Howard
From page 30 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the 1860s, two prospectors were working a rich gold mine somewhere west of Fort Collins, Colorado. History has forgotten their last names. They were known only as Hans and Mike. One day they quarreled, and Mike killed Hans.

The gold claim the two men had worked was somewhere west of Fort Collins, up the Cache la Poudre, in the Shining Mountains. Soldiers at the fort thought they could scare Mike into revealing the mines location by threatening to hang him for killing his partner. But they apparently strung him up too long, for the mock hanging backfired and Mike lay dead, too.

In 1899 a small boy was lost in the mountains. When he found his way home, he told of staying at an abandoned cabin high in the mountains where interesting, shining rocks lay on the table.



Utah's Most Fabulous Treasure

By Al Masters
From page 34 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was in the summer of 1914 that Freddie Crystal first showed up at Oscar Robinsons ranch at Kanab, Utah. For some reason Robinson, owner of one of the oldest ranches in Kane County, hired the sun-baked old saddle tramp, although it was apparent from the beginning that Crystal would be worth little as a cowhand.

Most of the time old Freddie spent fiddling around with the neighborhood kids, telling them tales about the Spaniard Cortez and his armor-clad conquistadores. Other times he would tell his favorite story of how Montezumas men had brought a fabulous treasure out of Mexico to hide it somewhere in the western United States.



Missing Oklahoma Gold

By Steve Wilson
From page 39 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Civil War in the Indian Territory of what is now the state of Oklahoma was devastating and tragic. The Indians of the Five Civilized Tribes were forced to fend for themselves, as the Federal Government had removed its troops, leaving the land to be overrun by outlaws and renegades. And that the lawless region was infested by a brutal breed of bandits is well known.

At the beginning of the war, Philip Usray lived at Sallisaw, in the densely timbered hills of present Sequoyah County. He was neutral in his feelings and wished to avoid involvement with either side in the conflict, but, he had horses and mules which the Union forces needed badly, and since they could pay in gold, Usray sold them his stock.



Midwest Ghost Towns

By Chuck Zehnder
From page 40 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It looked like an old road. I had passed it many times on the highway running north of town, but had never really paid any attention to it. Now that I had noticed the road, I was curious to see if it led to Calhoun, Iowa, a town which had been dead for more than half a century.

My ghost-towning had begun in the upper Midwest in 1963, after I had been discharged from the army and had entered the University of South Dakota in Vermilion. It began because of a bet. One of my friends had bet me a $10 bill that there were no ghost towns in the county. Since I will do just about anything for $10, I accepted the challenge and headed for the W. H. Over Museum library.



It Will Pay To Research First

By Earl F. Dupree
From page 48 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In July 1864, a government caravan loaded with military stores for Fort Union, New Mexico, left Fort Leavenworth for the long and dangerous journey of more than 700 miles over the plains. In this particular season the plains were infested by Indians, to a degree almost without precedent in the annals of freight traffic.

Thus begins another of the numerous stories connected with this particular freight caravan. It is probably one of the best documented and best known of the many wagon trains massacres, with, of course, the proverbial shipment of gold $90,000 to $120,000which was hidden at the last minute and never recovered.



Civil War Relics On Cabin Creek

By Bill Lees
From page 59 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you walk along Cabin Creek in eastern Oklahoma when the water is very low, dont fail to watch closely for something that looks like a cannon sticking up from the creek bed. It probably will be a Confederate Civil War cannon that has been lost since the Battle of Cabin Creek, which occurred on September 19, 1864.

Cabin Creek runs through the battlefield, and the point where the cannon is believed to have been lost is two and one-tenth miles due north of Pensacola, in Mayes County.

There are several versions of the manner in which the cannon was lost. It is most widely believed that the gun was dumped into the creek by retreating Confederate soldiers to prevent its falling into the hands of the Yankees.



Lost Cache Of $20 Gold Coins

By Lora M. Conant
From page 62 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


A cache of one thousand $20 gold pieces lies hidden somewhere in ralo Duro Canyon in the Texas Panhandle. The gold was mined in California, minted in Arizona, and taken to the valley of the South Canadian River. From there it was carried down the Tierra and Frio draws to the meadowland of Palo Duro Canyon.



Letters

By G. B. Selease, Sr.
From page 6 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Being reasonably close to the scene of the action, I have watched with a great deal of interestand a hell of a lot of amusementthe various efforts expended at Nehalem, Oregon, trying to locate a buried treasure.

To reach a proper perspective, one should remember that this treasure legend is built around the finding of chunks of beeswax in the beach sands of Nehalem, a few odd marks on rocks in the area, and the stories told to the white man by local Indians.

There is probably a teepee full of Indians in the Great Land In The Sky, and a few hundred more on the ground below, laughing their scaiplocks loose from their belts at the resultant antics of the (gullible) white man!

G. B. Sclease, Sr., Reecisport, Oregon



Delaware's Jinxed Treasure Ship

By Al Masters
From page 13 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On Delaware Bay, 104 miles south of the bustling city of Wilmington, Delaware, is the little town of Lewes in Sussex County. If you should travel to Lewes and go to the old graveyard there, located by St. Peters Episcopal Church on the west corner of Second and Market Street, you will find an old tombstone bearing the following inscription:

Here Rest The Remains Of Captain James Drew Who Commanded His Britannic Majestys Sloop Of War deBraak In Which He Lost His Life When She Foundered At The Capes of Delaware The 10th of June, 1798. He Was Beloved For His Virtues And Admired For His Bravery His Affectionate Relict Has Erected This Monument To Perpetuate His Memory



Mississippi's Missing Barrels Of Gold

By Leonard P. Kiedrowski
From page 20 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Near a home on the banks of Catahoula Creek in Mississippi lie three barrels of gold, the location of which has baffled treasure hunters of the area for 125 years. It is the bandit loot of the Copeland gang, and it is buried near the city of Pearlington, a few miles from the fabulous Gold Coast of the Gulf of Mexico.

The story of these barrels of treasure is somewhat complex. Although the existence of the treasure is verified by many old citizens whose parents knew of the robber gang, the actual location of the huge cache of loot may be farther north, near the old Gainesvile area. If this is true, it is probably within the boundaries of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) complex, which would make it strictly off limits for treasure hunters.



Lost Arkansas Silver Mine

By Jacques Tisserand
From page 23 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In Boone County, Arkansas, there is an old Spanish silver mine on a mountain that now waits to be found for the third time. It happened this way:

In 1880, near what is now the community of Batavia in Boone County, the proprietor of Reas General Store sat with his sons at the supper table and listened to a story told in broken English by an old man who apparently was of Spanish descent.

Earlier, the old man had meekly asked for food and a place to sleep. After having been kindly cared for by Rea, he may, have told his story as a means of repaying the storekeepers generosity. Whatever his motives, the old man laid out a weathered map on the table and with a gnarled forefinger he pointed out a symbol which be interpreted as Pilot Knob.