Treasure Wreck!

By Burt D. Webber, Jr.
From page 22 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Of all the sunken treasures lost on remote reefs throughout the Caribbean, none has been more frequently sought than that of the reputed wreck of the 18th century Spanish frigate Nuestra Senora del Carmen, more commonly known as the Genovesa. This wreck lies somewhere on one of the many reefs forming the Pedro Bank, 100 miles southwest of the Island of Jamaica.

The Genovesa has long been the target of treasure hunting expeditions, some of them well publicized, while others have been unknown. Expeditions have ranged from mere adventuring to the most thoroughly equipped and well-organized groups representing substantial investments.



Lost Black Mountain Gold

By John Howard
From page 30 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the 1860s, two prospectors were working a rich gold mine somewhere west of Fort Collins, Colorado. History has forgotten their last names. They were known only as Hans and Mike. One day they quarreled, and Mike killed Hans.

The gold claim the two men had worked was somewhere west of Fort Collins, up the Cache la Poudre, in the Shining Mountains. Soldiers at the fort thought they could scare Mike into revealing the mines location by threatening to hang him for killing his partner. But they apparently strung him up too long, for the mock hanging backfired and Mike lay dead, too.

In 1899 a small boy was lost in the mountains. When he found his way home, he told of staying at an abandoned cabin high in the mountains where interesting, shining rocks lay on the table.



Utah's Most Fabulous Treasure

By Al Masters
From page 34 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was in the summer of 1914 that Freddie Crystal first showed up at Oscar Robinsons ranch at Kanab, Utah. For some reason Robinson, owner of one of the oldest ranches in Kane County, hired the sun-baked old saddle tramp, although it was apparent from the beginning that Crystal would be worth little as a cowhand.

Most of the time old Freddie spent fiddling around with the neighborhood kids, telling them tales about the Spaniard Cortez and his armor-clad conquistadores. Other times he would tell his favorite story of how Montezumas men had brought a fabulous treasure out of Mexico to hide it somewhere in the western United States.



Missing Oklahoma Gold

By Steve Wilson
From page 39 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Civil War in the Indian Territory of what is now the state of Oklahoma was devastating and tragic. The Indians of the Five Civilized Tribes were forced to fend for themselves, as the Federal Government had removed its troops, leaving the land to be overrun by outlaws and renegades. And that the lawless region was infested by a brutal breed of bandits is well known.

At the beginning of the war, Philip Usray lived at Sallisaw, in the densely timbered hills of present Sequoyah County. He was neutral in his feelings and wished to avoid involvement with either side in the conflict, but, he had horses and mules which the Union forces needed badly, and since they could pay in gold, Usray sold them his stock.



Midwest Ghost Towns

By Chuck Zehnder
From page 40 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It looked like an old road. I had passed it many times on the highway running north of town, but had never really paid any attention to it. Now that I had noticed the road, I was curious to see if it led to Calhoun, Iowa, a town which had been dead for more than half a century.

My ghost-towning had begun in the upper Midwest in 1963, after I had been discharged from the army and had entered the University of South Dakota in Vermilion. It began because of a bet. One of my friends had bet me a $10 bill that there were no ghost towns in the county. Since I will do just about anything for $10, I accepted the challenge and headed for the W. H. Over Museum library.



Lost Texas Lead Mine

By George B. Hamilton
From page 59 of the May, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For generations, stories have been told of a lost lead mine near Brookeland, Texas. Brookeland is in Sabine County, in extreme East Texas, and the mines location, according to differing versions, could be on either of three creeksMcKim Creek, Rock Creek or Beef Creek.

It is recorded that Sabine County is the only area in this vicinity in which lead has been listed as a resource. Small amounts of low-grade ore have been found in northern sections of Sabine County, but very little of it has been mined. Some of the countys early settlers are known to have mined an almost pure lead ore in the southern region, and it is here that the lost major lead mine is believed to be located.



Delaware's Jinxed Treasure Ship

By Al Masters
From page 13 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On Delaware Bay, 104 miles south of the bustling city of Wilmington, Delaware, is the little town of Lewes in Sussex County. If you should travel to Lewes and go to the old graveyard there, located by St. Peters Episcopal Church on the west corner of Second and Market Street, you will find an old tombstone bearing the following inscription:

Here Rest The Remains Of Captain James Drew Who Commanded His Britannic Majestys Sloop Of War deBraak In Which He Lost His Life When She Foundered At The Capes of Delaware The 10th of June, 1798. He Was Beloved For His Virtues And Admired For His Bravery His Affectionate Relict Has Erected This Monument To Perpetuate His Memory



Mississippi's Missing Barrels Of Gold

By Leonard P. Kiedrowski
From page 20 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Near a home on the banks of Catahoula Creek in Mississippi lie three barrels of gold, the location of which has baffled treasure hunters of the area for 125 years. It is the bandit loot of the Copeland gang, and it is buried near the city of Pearlington, a few miles from the fabulous Gold Coast of the Gulf of Mexico.

The story of these barrels of treasure is somewhat complex. Although the existence of the treasure is verified by many old citizens whose parents knew of the robber gang, the actual location of the huge cache of loot may be farther north, near the old Gainesvile area. If this is true, it is probably within the boundaries of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) complex, which would make it strictly off limits for treasure hunters.



Lost Arkansas Silver Mine

By Jacques Tisserand
From page 23 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In Boone County, Arkansas, there is an old Spanish silver mine on a mountain that now waits to be found for the third time. It happened this way:

In 1880, near what is now the community of Batavia in Boone County, the proprietor of Reas General Store sat with his sons at the supper table and listened to a story told in broken English by an old man who apparently was of Spanish descent.

Earlier, the old man had meekly asked for food and a place to sleep. After having been kindly cared for by Rea, he may, have told his story as a means of repaying the storekeepers generosity. Whatever his motives, the old man laid out a weathered map on the table and with a gnarled forefinger he pointed out a symbol which be interpreted as Pilot Knob.



Oklahoma's Missing Army Payroll

By Steve Wilson
From page 24 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1885, a regular stage and freight route was established between Henrietta, Texas, and Fort Sill, Oklahoma, then in the Kiowa-Comanche-Apache country of Indian Territory.

The stage made periodic trips to the fort, carrying soldiers, dignitaries and their wives, Indian agents, mail, and occasionally the government payroll.

In good weather the trip took a full day. It was shortly after this route had opened that the stage company contracted to transport $96,000 in gold to Fort Sill, nestled in the foothills of the rugged Wichita Mountains, to be paid to the soldiers.



Town Of Little Treasures

By T. W. Paterson
From page 26 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you are a serious treasure hunter who will settle for the little treasures, then Cumberland, British Columbia, is the place for you.

Unlike legendary lost mines, you dont have to brave mountain wilds or desert heat to make your finds in Cumberlands Chinatown. There are no yellowed, hand-drawn maps to get you lostattractive road maps printed by the provincial government show the way quite clearly.



Treasure Thorough A Keyhole

By Gerald T. Ahnert
From page 31 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Some of my very best finds while treasure hunting have been made as the result of my trying, possibly with some success, to understand the habits and actions of people. But, being an adult, I found that I had thought only in adult terms. A recent discovery taught me that sometimes I must also think as a playing child.

A house in Oregon in which my wife and I rented an apartment was built in the 1890s. Some of the inside doors were equipped with locks that could be operated by skeleton keys. I wanted to make the house more secure, so I tried to lock the hail door with an old skeleton key.



Treasure At Castle Cap

By Jeff W. Henderson
From page 37 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The narrow walls of Castle Gap in far west Texas, east of U.S. Highway 385 between Crane and McCamey, hold many stories of hidden treasures that have never been found. The most famous of these concerns the fabulous treasure of Maximilian, Napoleon IIIs puppet emperor of Mexico, who was deposed and shot by Mexican revolutionists in 1867. According to this story, Maximilian attempted to send his fortune in gold and jewels out of Mexico before escaping himself, but a group of ex-Confederate soldiers murdered the wagoneers and guards and cached the treasure somewhere in Castle Gap.



Poison Pests

By Don Gresser
From page 40 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This article was not written with the intention of scaring anyone half to death, nor was it meant to give the impression that poisonous creatures outdoors overly infest the great.

It is simply that the treasure-hunting fraternity has grown enormously during the past few years, coincidentally with the great improvement in the metal detector. And among the thousands of new prospectors who have entered the field there are undoubtedly many who have very little or no personal knowledge of the various species of wildlife whose bites or stings may cause serious trouble, or even death.



It Will Pay To Research First

By Earl F. Dupree
From page 48 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In July 1864, a government caravan loaded with military stores for Fort Union, New Mexico, left Fort Leavenworth for the long and dangerous journey of more than 700 miles over the plains. In this particular season the plains were infested by Indians, to a degree almost without precedent in the annals of freight traffic.

Thus begins another of the numerous stories connected with this particular freight caravan. It is probably one of the best documented and best known of the many wagon trains massacres, with, of course, the proverbial shipment of gold $90,000 to $120,000which was hidden at the last minute and never recovered.



Civil War Relics On Cabin Creek

By Bill Lees
From page 59 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you walk along Cabin Creek in eastern Oklahoma when the water is very low, dont fail to watch closely for something that looks like a cannon sticking up from the creek bed. It probably will be a Confederate Civil War cannon that has been lost since the Battle of Cabin Creek, which occurred on September 19, 1864.

Cabin Creek runs through the battlefield, and the point where the cannon is believed to have been lost is two and one-tenth miles due north of Pensacola, in Mayes County.

There are several versions of the manner in which the cannon was lost. It is most widely believed that the gun was dumped into the creek by retreating Confederate soldiers to prevent its falling into the hands of the Yankees.



Lost Cache Of $20 Gold Coins

By Lora M. Conant
From page 62 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


A cache of one thousand $20 gold pieces lies hidden somewhere in ralo Duro Canyon in the Texas Panhandle. The gold was mined in California, minted in Arizona, and taken to the valley of the South Canadian River. From there it was carried down the Tierra and Frio draws to the meadowland of Palo Duro Canyon.



Letters

By G. B. Selease, Sr.
From page 6 of the April, 1971 issue of True Treasure
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Being reasonably close to the scene of the action, I have watched with a great deal of interestand a hell of a lot of amusementthe various efforts expended at Nehalem, Oregon, trying to locate a buried treasure.

To reach a proper perspective, one should remember that this treasure legend is built around the finding of chunks of beeswax in the beach sands of Nehalem, a few odd marks on rocks in the area, and the stories told to the white man by local Indians.

There is probably a teepee full of Indians in the Great Land In The Sky, and a few hundred more on the ground below, laughing their scaiplocks loose from their belts at the resultant antics of the (gullible) white man!

G. B. Sclease, Sr., Reecisport, Oregon



Small Treasures

By Leslie Payne
From page 63 of the March, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Not all of us will ever discover hidden caches of gold, fabulous lost mines, or missing Gutenberg Bibles. But the odds against this should not stifle the joy of searching for the big one.

While one follows the sometimes trifling leads to the end of the rainbow, there are many treasures which should not be overlooked along the way. Some of these finds are salable just as they are found. Others require a little work to be converted from unimportant items to treasure.

Chert chipsflinty chips that fell from the hands of ancient arrow makerscan be found on the sites of most Indian villages and frequented camps. Colors of these chipi range from deep red jasper to honey agate, from translucent white quartz to smoky obsidian.



Lost Cherokee Gold Of The Appalachians

By Eugene Anderson
From page 13 of the March, 1971 issue of Treasure World
Copyright © 1971 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure stories often evolve under the strangest of circumstances. It was during a casual conversation with a total stranger, who later identified himself as an emperor of the Cherokee Nation, that I first heard of a fortune in gold hidden somewhere in the southern Appalachians.

The gold was hidden by the Cherokees when a gold rush in northern Georgia eventually forced them off their lands and onto what was to become known as the Cherokee Trail of Tears. Their displacement was so swift and complete that the gold hidden in the early 1830s was never recovered.