Papago Gold and the Pale Ones

By Gene Kivett
From page 41 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Papago Indians of southern Arizona have a tradition that a long time ago - possibly as much as 300 years - a group of white strangers came and lived among their ancestors for several years. The "pale ones," as the Indians called the strangers, came from a far-off land, rode horses, were armed with metal spears and swords, and left a treasure.

This account by the Papagos of white men living among their people is attested to by several ancient metal objects now on display in the museum of the University of Arizona.

The Papagos say that the pale ones were extremely kind to their people, treating their ailments, teaching them better ways to irrigate their crops, and in general being good neighbors.



Graveyard of the Pacific

By J.w. Beard
From page 44 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Just a little over a century ago, what began as a collision of little consequence rapidly became the worst maritime accident ever to occur on the Pacific Coast of the continental United States.

Because of the horrible death toll when the "Pacific" went down, little was made of the fact that a strongbox with gold also sank. However, at the price of gold today, it might be profitable to attempt to salvage that strongbox.

The Pacific was a big, side-wheel steamship of 875 tons built in New York in 1851. She was shortly thereafter brought to the Pacific Coast and for a brief time carried passengers between the Isthmus of Panama and California.



Treasure In Maryland

By D. Van Atchley
From page 61 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Not far fram Frederick, Maryland, is the town of Braddock, not to be confused with nearby Braddock Heights. On a mountain near there is buried a chest of jewels stolen from a French duchess. The location should not be far from the old Hagen Tavern.

In 1830, a stranger came to the old tavern and stayed awhile as a guest. While there, the man cached a fortune in jewels on one of the neighboring mountains and then left. Residents at the time knew nothing of the man and his stolen treasure. He was just another traveler.



Cache at Mud Springs Station

By C. Kutac
From page 62 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1865, the Sioux ran rampant over Colorado and Nebraska, attacking wagon trains and stage stations, and killing and burning with abandon. One soldier fell victim to the Indians, and when his body was found, it contained 97 arrows by actual count.

The Indians destroyed telegraph lines, stole food and supplies and even held parts of the overland trail under their control. Several times the Sioux decoyed cavalry troops into rushing headlong to their deaths. When Indians attacked civilians, the soldiers usually arrived too late to be of any help.



Island Hideaway In The Caribbean

By Long John Latham
From page 63 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you are like me, the sight of a mountainous, green tropical island rising out of the sea is like a spine-tingling call to adventure.

We have been looking for just such a place, an island in the sun where treasure hunters can go and vacation cheaply. Dive for treasure on shipwrecks visible in azure blue waters. Snorkel over a coral reef that stretches for miles along the island shore. Explore Mayan ruins. Or just bask in the sun under wind-rustled palms along a curving beach of indescribable beauty.

And we think we have found it!



Dr. Hayes' Lost Gold

By W. Craig Gaines
From page 19 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Near the boundary of the Choctaw and Cherokee Nations before the Civil War, a Dr. Hayes ran a store on the banks of the Arkansas River. He grew quite wealthy by trading with the prosperous Chero-kee and Choctaw Indians. Since his store was located near where the Canadian River flows into the Arkansas River, Dr. Hayes also operated a ferry, boatlanding and warehouse.



Santa Rosa Gold

By Robert Miller
From page 20 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Gold lies secreted somewhere in the barren Santa Rosa Mountains, which loom up from the desert floor a few miles northeast of Borrego Springs, California. Some gold has been found and carried away, and some gold has been found and lost.

Stories of lost gold include the Lost Pegleg Mine. Tons of large and small rocks are piled in the desert near the tip of Coyote Mountain. They were placed there by those who have searched for this mine, and the pile is known as the Pegleg Smith Monument. Adding a stone to the pile will put you in the company of THers who have searched for the lost mine for nearly 150 years.



Beleaguered Bullion

By Bill Moody
From page 23 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Although Robert E. Lee officially surrendered the Confederate army at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, winding down the war took a while longer. Lincoln's death on April 15 threw the whole of Reconstruction into turmoil.

One of the unresolved mysteries of this turmoil is what happened to $35,000 to $40,000 in silver bullion which had been destined for relief of injured Confederate veterans.

The money was given by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to Raphael J. Moses, the Confederate Commissary Officer, during Davis' flight through Washington, Georgia, during May of 1865. An official Confederate order confirms the transfer of funds, but thereafter the fate of the money becomes uncertain.



Horsethief Trail Gold

By George A. Thompson
From page 25 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the cedared foothills of the La Sal Mountains of southeastern Utah, there is a lost lode of red-colored gold ore. Although it was along the ancient Indian trail that comes from the southwest to meet the Old Spanish Trail, its exact location has been a mystery for nearly a century now.

Old La Sal is a ghost town today, but during the 1870's it was a promising settlement on the pack-mule mail route from Salina, Utah, to Ouray, Colorado. The Roys, Maxwells and McCartys (the latter of cattle-rustling and bank-robbery fame) were the first settlers of Old La Sal, ranching there as early as 1873.



Owens Lake's Lost Silver Bars

By Richard Taylor
From page 29 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


"She's goin down fast, Capn!" the deckhand shouted as the cold waters of Lake Owens began to ripple across the wooden deck of the "Mollie Stevens." "Shall we try to save the silver?"

"To hell with the silver; we'll be lucky to get ourselves off this tub!" the captain retorted. "Get in," he ordered, as he climbed into the one skiff the little steamboat carried. "They can send divers out here if they want the silver."



Lost Silver Mine On Tumbling Creek

By J. Marty
From page 30 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The horse which wandered into Charles Green's camp carried an unconscious man. Green tugged the stranger off, laid him down and started trying to reduce his raging fever.

Green's 1901 camp was hardly equipped as a hospital, for he had only recently come to Oklahoma from Texas after an unsuccessful job search. But he nursed the stranger as best he could.

During the night, the sick man regained consciousness enough to beg Green to help him, promising riches if he survived. He babbled about treasure in Tennessee, and Green listened in surprise, for most of his life had been spent in Tennessee and Georgia.



Lodi's Lost Loot

By N. L. Harrison
From page 39 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Murderers seldom kill strangers, law enforcement officials report. Jealousy, greed and anger with friends or relatives seem to cause most acts of violence.

Perhaps all three emotions were involved over a century ago in the little town of Lodi in south central Wisconsin. In mid-November of 1853, word raced through the community that Townsil Underhill had been murdered in a violent quarrel over money. Today, nobody remembers whether the money had been inherited, stolen, embezzled or earned.

What is known is that two persons close to Underhill were arrested for the crime. They were Alfred Underhill, a brother, and Fountain Carpenter, a half-brother. If the passion which triggered the killing was greed, it is reasonable to believe that a large sum was involved.



Walker's Lost Gold

By Sharon L. Paul
From page 40 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over $100 million in gold was mined from the rich Boise Basin area in Idaho during the early days. According to many, especially those who believe the story of Walker's lost gold, there is more to come.

Reputedly adjacent to the famous Basin area, it may have been one of the richest finds of all, and still is waiting to be rediscovered.



Buried Treasure on the Cache La Poudre

By D. Van Atchley
From page 60 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1911, Jacques LaBorgeans arrived in Fort Collins, Colorado, asking about certain landmarks in the area, then began recruiting men from town to guide him to these landmarks. LaBorgeans, a French-Canadian, made no secret of his purpose and told everyone he was looking for his late uncle's lost treasure cache.

LaBorgeans related to the residents that his uncle had been one of the many men who went west to the California gold fields and there, with luck, he had made a success prospecting. After a period of five years, his uncle decided to take his gold and return home. This was in 1857.



Treasure of the Bellone

By W. Craig Gaines
From page 36 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In September of 1724, a French vessel was sighted off the coast of present-day Alabama. The vessel was the Bellone. In her hold was stored a cargo of beaver skins, deer hides, and coins and bullion valued at 60,000 crowns. She was on her way to Dauphine Island to collect the yearly production of goods by French colonials in Louisiana, and transport them to France.



Buffalo Gap's Hidden Gap

By D. Van Atchley
From page 38 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


One of the most sought-after treasures in the Abilene, Texas, area is the gold cache in Buffalo Gap, believed to have been buried by Forty-niners returning from the California gold fields. Many a wagon train traveling to and from the west was funneled through Buffalo Gap on the major route through Texas.

Travelers headed west would leave Fort Phantom Hill from the north, go south toward Fort Concho and San Angelo, thence to El Paso and on to California. The route was equally traveled by per-sons returning east. Between the north-south outposts was Buffalo Gap, a narrow opening in the mountains through which all had to pass.

It was somewhere in Buffalo Gap that one group of successful miners was ambushed by Indians.



The Lost Padre Mine

By Jeff W. Henderson
From page 54 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Probably the richest lost mine in Mexico is one many call the Lost Padre Mine of the Vacatete Mountains. It is believed to be somewhere near the old mining town of Sahuaripa in the Vacatete Mountains of Sonora, Mexico. This would be almost due east of Hermosilla and not too far from the little coastal town of Guaymas.

According to the extensive Catholic Church archives in Mexico City, a tremendous amount of gold and silver was mined from the Lost Padre Mine in the late 1600's and early 1700's. Jesuit priests and their Indian converts crushed the ore in arrastres and smelted the precious metals. Ingots of gold and silver were cast and shipped to Mexico City.



Black Caesar's Florida Treasure Troves

By Howard M. Duffy.
From page 13 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the early days of the 19th century, Henri Caesar, better known as Black Caesar, was one of the most feared pirates to sail the Spanish Main. Through his pillaging and plundering activities, he was able to amass a great fortune. Part of it was secreted at two different sites on the Florida coast and, to this day, it has never been recovered.



Lost Utah Gold Cave

By Kerry Ross Boren
From page 56 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Blomquist family of Richfield, Utah, have hunted many years for an elusive treasure they are certain exists in a small area northeast of that little town. The elder Blomquist operated a saloon in Richfield for many years and the boys were raised in the region.

While still a youth, one of the boys, Carl, was approached by an old Indian who told him that if he would give him some whiskey, he would show the boy where there was a Spanish gold cache. Carl borrowed some of his father's stock and he and the old Indian set out for the mountains.



The Reno Gang Treasure

By Fred F. Hoback, Sr.
From page 14 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Jesse James has been credited with planning the technique of the
first train robbery. However, a more industrious outlaw named John Rerio deserves this dubious honor. He headed the first organized gang of daylight robbers and train hold-up men in the United States.

Like the James brothers, the Renos were a family gang who operated in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa. They included Clinton, Frank, John, Simon and William Reno.

The Reno gang's reign was much shorter than that of the James brothers, but it was much more rewarding. The Renos got away with sums of money that were staggering in their time. I have been able to verify that they stole over $169,175. Today's prices for gold and silver coins would raise the value of this figure perhaps ten times.