Treasure of the Great Diamond Hoax

By Xanthus Carson
From page 19 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Shakespeare, New Mexico, south of today's Lordsburg, was originally named Ralston after a San Francisco millionaire with interests in the area. A roaring mining camp at one time, along in 1870 the excitement commenced to peter out.

Shakespeare would have waned and died except that, out of a clear blue sky, so it seemed, another boom flared up. Diamonds were found in the anthills of Lee's Peak near Ralston.

News of the discovery made headlines when a couple of prospectors stalked into a San Francisco bank and approached the teller's cage.

The men, dressed as though they had just come in from a rugged prospecting trip, were Phillip Arnold and W. D. Brown, who had figured prominently in the silver lode discovery in the Ralston field.



Yucatan Jade Treasure

By Jeff Ferguson
From page 21 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For some years following the Texas War for Independence from Mexico, a number of ships flying the Texas flag continued to wage war at sea, preventing Mexican piracy and harrassing Mexican merchant and military shipping. One of these, the Texas Navy's man-o-war "Independence," lay in the southern Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Yucatan in the spring of 1841, hoping for a rich prize.



Pirate Low's Buried Treasure

By Jeff Violette
From page 23 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On a tiny island off the beautiful Maine coast in the vicinity of Harpswell lies a treasure which has been buried there for more than 250 years. Secreted by New England's most infamous pirate, Capt. Edward Low in 1723, it is not known to have been recovered.

Low's earlier life is interesting, and from it we can understand the reasons behind his piratical and barbarous ways.

Edward Low was born in Westminster, England, late in the seventeenth century into a family of ruffians. His brother was one of the better-known pickpockets and petty thieves of the area, subsequently charged, convicted and executed by hanging.



Rockefeller Treasure In Kansas

By Ben Townsend
From page 25 of the September, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Priceless relics and money caches which once belonged to relatives of Vice-President Nelson A. Rockefeller may be the prime target for treasure hunters in a small Kansas town. They were left there because they were too much trouble for Frank Rockefeller to load into his wagon!

The little-known treasure town is Belvidere, located in Kiowa County in south central Kansas. The Rockefeller treasures may be almost limitless, ranging from relics valued at well over $100,000 to a series of money caches, thought to number about a dozen, each estimated to contain about $1,000.



Dr. Hayes' Lost Gold

By W. Craig Gaines
From page 19 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Near the boundary of the Choctaw and Cherokee Nations before the Civil War, a Dr. Hayes ran a store on the banks of the Arkansas River. He grew quite wealthy by trading with the prosperous Chero-kee and Choctaw Indians. Since his store was located near where the Canadian River flows into the Arkansas River, Dr. Hayes also operated a ferry, boatlanding and warehouse.



Santa Rosa Gold

By Robert Miller
From page 20 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Gold lies secreted somewhere in the barren Santa Rosa Mountains, which loom up from the desert floor a few miles northeast of Borrego Springs, California. Some gold has been found and carried away, and some gold has been found and lost.

Stories of lost gold include the Lost Pegleg Mine. Tons of large and small rocks are piled in the desert near the tip of Coyote Mountain. They were placed there by those who have searched for this mine, and the pile is known as the Pegleg Smith Monument. Adding a stone to the pile will put you in the company of THers who have searched for the lost mine for nearly 150 years.



Beleaguered Bullion

By Bill Moody
From page 23 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Although Robert E. Lee officially surrendered the Confederate army at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, winding down the war took a while longer. Lincoln's death on April 15 threw the whole of Reconstruction into turmoil.

One of the unresolved mysteries of this turmoil is what happened to $35,000 to $40,000 in silver bullion which had been destined for relief of injured Confederate veterans.

The money was given by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to Raphael J. Moses, the Confederate Commissary Officer, during Davis' flight through Washington, Georgia, during May of 1865. An official Confederate order confirms the transfer of funds, but thereafter the fate of the money becomes uncertain.



Horsethief Trail Gold

By George A. Thompson
From page 25 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the cedared foothills of the La Sal Mountains of southeastern Utah, there is a lost lode of red-colored gold ore. Although it was along the ancient Indian trail that comes from the southwest to meet the Old Spanish Trail, its exact location has been a mystery for nearly a century now.

Old La Sal is a ghost town today, but during the 1870's it was a promising settlement on the pack-mule mail route from Salina, Utah, to Ouray, Colorado. The Roys, Maxwells and McCartys (the latter of cattle-rustling and bank-robbery fame) were the first settlers of Old La Sal, ranching there as early as 1873.



Owens Lake's Lost Silver Bars

By Richard Taylor
From page 29 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


"She's goin down fast, Capn!" the deckhand shouted as the cold waters of Lake Owens began to ripple across the wooden deck of the "Mollie Stevens." "Shall we try to save the silver?"

"To hell with the silver; we'll be lucky to get ourselves off this tub!" the captain retorted. "Get in," he ordered, as he climbed into the one skiff the little steamboat carried. "They can send divers out here if they want the silver."



Lost Silver Mine On Tumbling Creek

By J. Marty
From page 30 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The horse which wandered into Charles Green's camp carried an unconscious man. Green tugged the stranger off, laid him down and started trying to reduce his raging fever.

Green's 1901 camp was hardly equipped as a hospital, for he had only recently come to Oklahoma from Texas after an unsuccessful job search. But he nursed the stranger as best he could.

During the night, the sick man regained consciousness enough to beg Green to help him, promising riches if he survived. He babbled about treasure in Tennessee, and Green listened in surprise, for most of his life had been spent in Tennessee and Georgia.



Lodi's Lost Loot

By N. L. Harrison
From page 39 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Murderers seldom kill strangers, law enforcement officials report. Jealousy, greed and anger with friends or relatives seem to cause most acts of violence.

Perhaps all three emotions were involved over a century ago in the little town of Lodi in south central Wisconsin. In mid-November of 1853, word raced through the community that Townsil Underhill had been murdered in a violent quarrel over money. Today, nobody remembers whether the money had been inherited, stolen, embezzled or earned.

What is known is that two persons close to Underhill were arrested for the crime. They were Alfred Underhill, a brother, and Fountain Carpenter, a half-brother. If the passion which triggered the killing was greed, it is reasonable to believe that a large sum was involved.



Walker's Lost Gold

By Sharon L. Paul
From page 40 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over $100 million in gold was mined from the rich Boise Basin area in Idaho during the early days. According to many, especially those who believe the story of Walker's lost gold, there is more to come.

Reputedly adjacent to the famous Basin area, it may have been one of the richest finds of all, and still is waiting to be rediscovered.



Buried Treasure on the Cache La Poudre

By D. Van Atchley
From page 60 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1911, Jacques LaBorgeans arrived in Fort Collins, Colorado, asking about certain landmarks in the area, then began recruiting men from town to guide him to these landmarks. LaBorgeans, a French-Canadian, made no secret of his purpose and told everyone he was looking for his late uncle's lost treasure cache.

LaBorgeans related to the residents that his uncle had been one of the many men who went west to the California gold fields and there, with luck, he had made a success prospecting. After a period of five years, his uncle decided to take his gold and return home. This was in 1857.



Island Hideaway In The Caribbean

By Long John Latham
From page 63 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you are like me, the sight of a mountainous, green tropical island rising out of the sea is like a spine-tingling call to adventure.

We have been looking for just such a place, an island in the sun where treasure hunters can go and vacation cheaply. Dive for treasure on shipwrecks visible in azure blue waters. Snorkel over a coral reef that stretches for miles along the island shore. Explore Mayan ruins. Or just bask in the sun under wind-rustled palms along a curving beach of indescribable beauty.

And we think we have found it!



Treasures Of The Devil's Backbone

By Howard M.duffy
From page 18 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Natchez Trace had as dark and bloody a history as any roadway in the early days of America. When flatboats floated down
the Mississippi, their crews and traders had to return north by land. The Trace grew out of the need for a return route up from Natchez through Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee to Nashville.

From its start, the route was a robber's paradise. Known because of its villainy as the Devil's Backbone, it was a road for the hunted as well as the hunters. Along it marched rugged pioneers, ladies of fashion, men of destiny, politicians, settlers and soldiers - the whole company of those ready to seize a continent.



Ghost Gold of Gravelly Ford

By John Roberts
From page 20 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When war whoops and cries of the Shoshone band filled the air around the station, they caught Agent George Brown unaware. He struggled vainly to reach his weapons as arrows rent the air.

The Indians ransacked the place and burned the few buildings. As the sound of their war ponies' hooves grew dim, Brown moved no more. The gold he had hoarded lay undisturbed, buried near the station.

Brown's Station site is east of Beowawe, Nevada, off Highway 80 on the route of the Old California Trail. In 1857, Brown worked as an agent for A. Woodard and Company, which carried mail between Genoa and Salt Lake City. His section of the line fell near Gravelly Ford, a favorite Shoshone spot for ambushing wagon trains.



Found: 152 Silver Dollars

By Ray D. Rains
From page 21 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


You can safely bet that here is one treasure hunter who will never again pass a burned-out stump without first scanning it with a metal detector. I might turn up 150 gold eagles instead of the 152 silver dollars I found recently while relic hunting on Little Red River in central Arkansas.

I was searching over an old home site which had been established in the 1840's and kept in one family's possession through the depression years. In the early 1930's, the farm was sold. Since then it has had a number of owners.



Missouri's Spanish Treasure Trove

By Ben Townsend
From page 22 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Dan Campbell looked comical as all get-out that bright spring day in 1849. Astride his long-eared mule, his legs were so long they scraped the ground. When he rode, he had to double them up to prevent his boots from dragging.

On this day, he was filled with excitement. He had just picked up a letter in town and something told him it was important, although he didn't know it would lead him to southeastern Missouri.

He ran his finger under the envelope flap and had just removed the letter when neighbor Jed Carwell came up.

"Looks like you got some news," he said.

"Yet, it's from Uncle Bill," replied Dan.

Suddenly, he was completely absorbed in the letter.

"He's down on Turkey Creed, ain't he?" asked Jed.



The Lost Simpson Mine

By D. Van Atchley
From page 25 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


West of Walsenburg, Colorado, is La Veta Pass. Lying north of this pass is Silver Mountain, the location of a very rich gold mine lost since 1869. It was discovered by a prospector named Jack Simpson in the same year.

Simpson was prospecting the La Veta Pass area when he located the vein on Silver Mountain. It proved to be very rich and almost free gold. Taking his first shipment into town, he made no secret of his find, even telling people it was located on Silver Mountain.



Rodeo Champ's Cache

By Benito Villa
From page 27 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On a hot June day in 1923, a new Cadillac sped west out of Paw-huska, Oklahoma, over a dirt road. A dust cloud whirled up behind it and blew out over the squat green hills like a sandstorm. Suddenly, the driver, John Mayo, was fighting the steering wheel and screaming, "Hold on! Hold on!"

The warning came too late. The car's wheels dropped into a pair of deep wagon ruts, throwing it out of control. It shot off the road and struck a boulder, flipping end over end. Mayo's wife screamed in terror as she was catapulted out the door.