Beleaguered Bullion

By Bill Moody
From page 23 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Although Robert E. Lee officially surrendered the Confederate army at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, winding down the war took a while longer. Lincoln's death on April 15 threw the whole of Reconstruction into turmoil.

One of the unresolved mysteries of this turmoil is what happened to $35,000 to $40,000 in silver bullion which had been destined for relief of injured Confederate veterans.

The money was given by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to Raphael J. Moses, the Confederate Commissary Officer, during Davis' flight through Washington, Georgia, during May of 1865. An official Confederate order confirms the transfer of funds, but thereafter the fate of the money becomes uncertain.



Horsethief Trail Gold

By George A. Thompson
From page 25 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the cedared foothills of the La Sal Mountains of southeastern Utah, there is a lost lode of red-colored gold ore. Although it was along the ancient Indian trail that comes from the southwest to meet the Old Spanish Trail, its exact location has been a mystery for nearly a century now.

Old La Sal is a ghost town today, but during the 1870's it was a promising settlement on the pack-mule mail route from Salina, Utah, to Ouray, Colorado. The Roys, Maxwells and McCartys (the latter of cattle-rustling and bank-robbery fame) were the first settlers of Old La Sal, ranching there as early as 1873.



Owens Lake's Lost Silver Bars

By Richard Taylor
From page 29 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


"She's goin down fast, Capn!" the deckhand shouted as the cold waters of Lake Owens began to ripple across the wooden deck of the "Mollie Stevens." "Shall we try to save the silver?"

"To hell with the silver; we'll be lucky to get ourselves off this tub!" the captain retorted. "Get in," he ordered, as he climbed into the one skiff the little steamboat carried. "They can send divers out here if they want the silver."



Lost Silver Mine On Tumbling Creek

By J. Marty
From page 30 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The horse which wandered into Charles Green's camp carried an unconscious man. Green tugged the stranger off, laid him down and started trying to reduce his raging fever.

Green's 1901 camp was hardly equipped as a hospital, for he had only recently come to Oklahoma from Texas after an unsuccessful job search. But he nursed the stranger as best he could.

During the night, the sick man regained consciousness enough to beg Green to help him, promising riches if he survived. He babbled about treasure in Tennessee, and Green listened in surprise, for most of his life had been spent in Tennessee and Georgia.



Lodi's Lost Loot

By N. L. Harrison
From page 39 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Murderers seldom kill strangers, law enforcement officials report. Jealousy, greed and anger with friends or relatives seem to cause most acts of violence.

Perhaps all three emotions were involved over a century ago in the little town of Lodi in south central Wisconsin. In mid-November of 1853, word raced through the community that Townsil Underhill had been murdered in a violent quarrel over money. Today, nobody remembers whether the money had been inherited, stolen, embezzled or earned.

What is known is that two persons close to Underhill were arrested for the crime. They were Alfred Underhill, a brother, and Fountain Carpenter, a half-brother. If the passion which triggered the killing was greed, it is reasonable to believe that a large sum was involved.



Walker's Lost Gold

By Sharon L. Paul
From page 40 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over $100 million in gold was mined from the rich Boise Basin area in Idaho during the early days. According to many, especially those who believe the story of Walker's lost gold, there is more to come.

Reputedly adjacent to the famous Basin area, it may have been one of the richest finds of all, and still is waiting to be rediscovered.



Buried Treasure on the Cache La Poudre

By D. Van Atchley
From page 60 of the August, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1911, Jacques LaBorgeans arrived in Fort Collins, Colorado, asking about certain landmarks in the area, then began recruiting men from town to guide him to these landmarks. LaBorgeans, a French-Canadian, made no secret of his purpose and told everyone he was looking for his late uncle's lost treasure cache.

LaBorgeans related to the residents that his uncle had been one of the many men who went west to the California gold fields and there, with luck, he had made a success prospecting. After a period of five years, his uncle decided to take his gold and return home. This was in 1857.



Treasure of the Bellone

By W. Craig Gaines
From page 36 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In September of 1724, a French vessel was sighted off the coast of present-day Alabama. The vessel was the Bellone. In her hold was stored a cargo of beaver skins, deer hides, and coins and bullion valued at 60,000 crowns. She was on her way to Dauphine Island to collect the yearly production of goods by French colonials in Louisiana, and transport them to France.



Buffalo Gap's Hidden Gap

By D. Van Atchley
From page 38 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


One of the most sought-after treasures in the Abilene, Texas, area is the gold cache in Buffalo Gap, believed to have been buried by Forty-niners returning from the California gold fields. Many a wagon train traveling to and from the west was funneled through Buffalo Gap on the major route through Texas.

Travelers headed west would leave Fort Phantom Hill from the north, go south toward Fort Concho and San Angelo, thence to El Paso and on to California. The route was equally traveled by per-sons returning east. Between the north-south outposts was Buffalo Gap, a narrow opening in the mountains through which all had to pass.

It was somewhere in Buffalo Gap that one group of successful miners was ambushed by Indians.



The Lost Padre Mine

By Jeff W. Henderson
From page 54 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Probably the richest lost mine in Mexico is one many call the Lost Padre Mine of the Vacatete Mountains. It is believed to be somewhere near the old mining town of Sahuaripa in the Vacatete Mountains of Sonora, Mexico. This would be almost due east of Hermosilla and not too far from the little coastal town of Guaymas.

According to the extensive Catholic Church archives in Mexico City, a tremendous amount of gold and silver was mined from the Lost Padre Mine in the late 1600's and early 1700's. Jesuit priests and their Indian converts crushed the ore in arrastres and smelted the precious metals. Ingots of gold and silver were cast and shipped to Mexico City.



Black Caesar's Florida Treasure Troves

By Howard M. Duffy.
From page 13 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the early days of the 19th century, Henri Caesar, better known as Black Caesar, was one of the most feared pirates to sail the Spanish Main. Through his pillaging and plundering activities, he was able to amass a great fortune. Part of it was secreted at two different sites on the Florida coast and, to this day, it has never been recovered.



Lost Utah Gold Cave

By Kerry Ross Boren
From page 56 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Blomquist family of Richfield, Utah, have hunted many years for an elusive treasure they are certain exists in a small area northeast of that little town. The elder Blomquist operated a saloon in Richfield for many years and the boys were raised in the region.

While still a youth, one of the boys, Carl, was approached by an old Indian who told him that if he would give him some whiskey, he would show the boy where there was a Spanish gold cache. Carl borrowed some of his father's stock and he and the old Indian set out for the mountains.



The Reno Gang Treasure

By Fred F. Hoback, Sr.
From page 14 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Jesse James has been credited with planning the technique of the
first train robbery. However, a more industrious outlaw named John Rerio deserves this dubious honor. He headed the first organized gang of daylight robbers and train hold-up men in the United States.

Like the James brothers, the Renos were a family gang who operated in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa. They included Clinton, Frank, John, Simon and William Reno.

The Reno gang's reign was much shorter than that of the James brothers, but it was much more rewarding. The Renos got away with sums of money that were staggering in their time. I have been able to verify that they stole over $169,175. Today's prices for gold and silver coins would raise the value of this figure perhaps ten times.



Buried Gold of the German Conquistador

By C. Kutac
From page 57 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Not all the conquistadors who explored the Americas were Spanish. At least one of them, Ambrosius Ehlinger, was German, although he was better known by the Spanish adaptation of his name, Ambrosio Alfinger.

His greed drove him deep into unexplored Venezuela. He left behind him plundered villages, slaughtered natives and a buried treasure consisting of 600 pounds of gold which has never been found.



Columbus' Lost Fort

By Dennis A. Gray
From page 15 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Most people know that Christopher Columbus discovered America in 1492 and little else about him. Few know of the treasure fleet that sank when the Governor of Hispaniola ignored Columbus' storm warnings (see Missing $6 Million in Gold, Lost Treasure, December 1975). Fewer still know of the fort Columbus founded on Hispaniola, which lies lost today.

On Christmas Eve of 1492, the entire crew of the Santa Maria was dead tired from their voyage. Only a young and inept crewman was still on deck to man the helm. Around midnight, the Santa Maria ran aground on a coral reef just off the north shore of what is now Haiti. By morning it was obvious that the ship was doomed.



Have We Found The Lost Arch Mine?

By W.R Robinson
From page 59 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


"My gosh, Rob, I believe we're onto something!"

The geologist speaking was my companion, Dick Moyle, and we were on a turquoise-hunting jaunt near Baker, California.

But he wasn't speaking of turquoise. He was talking about gold! Thousands of dollars worth of the beautiful yellow stuff might be right under our feet. All the landmarks seemed to be there, just as an old map had shown...the arch, the volcanic neck and the group of cactus.

Had we accidently stumbled onto the site of the famous Lost Arch Mine?



The Big Pottawatomie Chief's Treasure

By Ben Townsend
From page 16 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Ka-he-ga-wa-ti-an-gah was the biggest Indian chief the West ever saw. The Pottawatomie ruler lived in the northeastern part of Kansas Territory. He was so huge that no horse could support his weight, so he traveled about the country in a buggy which he kept spic and span.

He was always replacing the buggy springs because they pressed flat whenever he got in and never lasted long. To get in and out of the buggy, he carried along a portable set of porch steps, which he placed beside the buggy.

Many said the Indian's neck was big as a nail keg and his forearms were as large as the average man's thighs. He was so big around the middle that there were some doorways in the infant town of Topeka that he could not squeeze through.



Missing: 40 Tons of Gold and Jewels

By Ben T. Traywick
From page 63 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Long before the colonization of Roanoke in Virginia, and many years before the Pilgrims landed, other white men sailed a ship into a harbor across the North American continent, on the coast of what was to become California. And there is substantial evidence to indicate that more than 40 tons of gold, silver, jewels and other treasure may lie buried near this landing spot.

The captain of this ship was a muscular, red-haired, red-bearded Englishman named Francis Drake. Spain labeled him a pirate. England called him a patriot.

Drake loved England and held a bitter hatred for Spain. When still a boy, he had gone to sea with his cousin, Sir John Hawkins, whose ships plied the trade lanes between England and the Americas.



Treasures Of The Devil's Backbone

By Howard M.duffy
From page 18 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Natchez Trace had as dark and bloody a history as any roadway in the early days of America. When flatboats floated down
the Mississippi, their crews and traders had to return north by land. The Trace grew out of the need for a return route up from Natchez through Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee to Nashville.

From its start, the route was a robber's paradise. Known because of its villainy as the Devil's Backbone, it was a road for the hunted as well as the hunters. Along it marched rugged pioneers, ladies of fashion, men of destiny, politicians, settlers and soldiers - the whole company of those ready to seize a continent.



Ghost Gold of Gravelly Ford

By John Roberts
From page 20 of the July, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When war whoops and cries of the Shoshone band filled the air around the station, they caught Agent George Brown unaware. He struggled vainly to reach his weapons as arrows rent the air.

The Indians ransacked the place and burned the few buildings. As the sound of their war ponies' hooves grew dim, Brown moved no more. The gold he had hoarded lay undisturbed, buried near the station.

Brown's Station site is east of Beowawe, Nevada, off Highway 80 on the route of the Old California Trail. In 1857, Brown worked as an agent for A. Woodard and Company, which carried mail between Genoa and Salt Lake City. His section of the line fell near Gravelly Ford, a favorite Shoshone spot for ambushing wagon trains.