Testing Fisher Research Laboratory's Cz-70 Pro Quicksilver Metal Detector

By Joe Patrick
From page 31 of the September, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I believe that most people in the sport of metal detecting would agree that detecting relies heavily on the sense of sound and its interpretation.



Virgin Islands: Treasure In Paradise

By Jason Roberts
From page 36 of the September, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


 Lost treasures and shipwrecks are part of the history of the United States Virgin Islands, which are also called the USVI. Located in the eastern Caribbean Sea, just east of Puerto Rico, the USVI are a major commercial center and a tourist Mecca. They consist of the large mountainous islands of St. Thomas, St. Croix, and St. John, along with a number of smaller islands set in pristine warm waters.St. Croix was discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493 and was called Santa Cruz.



How Do This Year's Finds Look?

By Andy Sabisch
From page 38 of the September, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Hopefully you have had a successful year so far in terms of finding keepers in your searches. I’d like to think that many of the articles in Lost Treasure have helped you make this year the best yet in terms of what you found during the time you had for treasure hunting.The purpose of this month’s column is not to go over more ideas on where to search, but rather what to do with the items you have found.Recently I attended a two-day treasure hunt and spent a considerable amount of time talking with attendees and looking at dozens upon dozens of finds they had brought with them.



El Cazador: The Shipwreck That Changed The World

By John Minges
From page 46 of the September, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On January 11, 1784 the Spanish Brig of War El Cazador (The Hunter) set sail from Vera Cruz, Mexico for New Orleans carrying 450,000 freshly minted pesos of silver Reales. All the coins were minted in Mexico City and dated 1783 with the portrait of the ruler King Carolus III, King and Ruler of Spain who ruled between 1759 and 1788. In addition to these coins, 50,000 other pesos of silver in various forms of small change of various years and values were also aboard. The vessel and its crew disappeared without a trace in a winter sea storm. By June 1784, the ship and entire crew were officially listed as lost in both Vera Cruz and Louisiana.



Found In Ecuador: Drake's Discarded 45-ton Treasure

By Pat Hughes
From page 50 of the September, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


By Pat Hughes The destiny of two men, living in different centuries, seems to be linked by seeking the same Spanish treasure, and by using whatever means is necessary to get that loot; legitimate or not. The irony of this story is that most of the treasure may have already been found and still couldnt be used after it was found. The story starts in the 1500s with Sir Francis Drake. In that time, England was in dire straits. People were very poor and starving. Queen Elizabeth I believed that she had three legitimate goals for her country. The first was that England needed customers for her products. The New World would be a good place to start. The second was that the church needed to be completely independent of foreign jurisdictions, namely Spain.



Cache Found By The Krajewski Family

By Sheila K. Stogsdill
From page 52 of the September, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


A former Pennsylvania police officer, convicted of masterminding a plan to finance a treasure hunting expedition by robbing a drug dealers home, has found a multi-million dollar treasure cache off the coast of Ecuador. Edward P. Krajewski, Jr., 53, of Jamison, Pennsylvania, a deep-sea diver and novice treasure hunter, has spent 22 years looking for Sir Francis Drakes bounty. According to historians, Drake, a 14th century pirate, who was at odds with the Spanish, dumped 45 tons of silver into the Pacific Ocean, near La Plata Island, before sailing back to England in 1580. Today, La Plata Island, which means, silver in Spanish, is a small, uninhibited island surrounded by 200-foot cliffs, with an old hotel setting on small pillars.



Jesse James Hideout

By Janet Warford-perry
From page 7 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The quest for international treasures always appears to be a shroud of mystery and intrigue. For a variety of reasons, many people choose the comfort and security of metal detecting within their familiar homeland. But those treasure hunters who have decided to venture into foreign lands many times return not only with some terrific finds, but also with the pleasures garnered from experiencing firsthand different cultures. There is no textbook that will ever prepare a person for the visual experience of exploring a foreign country. For years, author Earl Blassingame and his wife dreamed of a cruise to a tropical island paradise. While overseas, she delighted in duty-free shopping while he preferred metal detecting the beaches.



Folsom Train Robbery: On The Trail Of Cassidy's Wild Bunch

By Linda Weinman
From page 8 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For more than a decade, Butch Cassidy and his wild bunch rode the outlaw trail from Canada to Mexico, making history during the late 1800s and early 1900s. At 9 p.m. on July 11, 1899, three men, Sam Ketchum, Harvey Logan, and Elza Lay robbed a Colorado and Southern passenger train seven miles north of Folsom, New Mexico. Logan and Lay were both members of Cassidys gang. The Ketchum gang was wanted by the law in Utah and Arizona for numerous robberies, and had to scatter far and wide to avoid arrest. Sam Ketchum arrived at the W.S. Ranch in Alma, New Mexico during the month of June 1899, where he met a few members of Cassidys bunch. A few weeks later Cassidy, Lay and Logan rode into the ranch looking for work.



Kidd's Deer Isle: Treasure Hoax Or True Tale?

By Pat Hughes
From page 10 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Captain Kidd is said to have buried treasure in over 69 places in Maine alone. If all the treasure that is credited to Kidd were really buried, Kidd wouldnt have had time to be a pirate. To understand the Deer Isle buried treasure hoax, one first has to understand the story of Captain Kidd. Captain Kidd was not a typical pirate captain. The story is that he was a meek gentleman of New York City, who was caught in a web of government intrigue and who died as a scapegoat. It is also said that he realized he was a scapegoat at the last minute, but sadly, could do nothing to prevent his hanging. Kidd was a sailor in the merchant service with a wife and family in New York, before being recruited by Sir George Bellomont or John Bellamont.



Found: Historical Wallet

By Sheila K. Stogsdill
From page 14 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Eric Franklin, warden at Jess Dunn Correctional Facility, thought somebody was playing a joke on him when he discovered a wallet in his office mailbox last Halloween. After all, he was standing in a correctional facility named after a slain Oklahoma warden and now he was holding a brown wallet bearing the same name. If this wasnt a joke, Franklin knew he was holding more than a piece of leather. He was holding a piece of McAlester history known as Bloody Sunday. Jess Dunn was the only Oklahoma State Penitentiary warden to be killed in the line of duty. The brown wallet Franklin held was in Dunns back pocket when he died in a blotched kidnapping prison escape organized by four inmates on Aug. 10, 1941.



Treasure Via Notoriety: The Hillside Massacre Weapon

By Carolyn Bouldin
From page 19 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The revolver does not appear special. It seems unthreatening, a somewhat old and weathered gun. The handle is made of walnut; the six cylinders are designed to hold black powder bullets common in the days of the wild, wild West. The revolver is an original Colt Single-Action Army, often referred to as the Peacemaker or the Frontier. Similar guns were standard issue in the American Army during all Indian campaigns after 1873, and General Patton carried his Peacemaker into World War II. Few Americans missed seeing such popular Colt revolvers in the cowboy and Indian movies of the wild American West.



Mount St. Helens: Did The Eruption Destroy The Mine

By Joe Meis
From page 24 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The next time you visit Mount St. Helens volcano observatory and explore nearby Spirit Lake, a body of water supposedly haunted, look for a ghost of a miner guiding a ghostly mule train. If you follow him across the volcanic blasted landscape, the miner may lead you to a fabulous rich gold mine. The mine lies along the fringe of the Cascade Mountain range, somewhere at the head of the Lewis River, in the wild, almost inaccessible territory between St. Helens and Mount Adams. A mysterious owner and a few tight-lipped Indians are the only ones reported to know the exact mine site. The original discoverer was a wandering Spaniard. Where he came from or how he came to invade the Cascade wilderness is unknown, so how he discovered the mine and where, are questions that remain unanswered.



Garrett Electronics Infinium Ls

By Andy Sabisch
From page 26 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Garrett Electronics has been a leading metal detector manufacturer for nearly 40 years building detectors using virtually all of the proven circuits ranging from BFO's to TR's, VLF's and PI's. Garrett's experience with Pulse Induction-based detectors dates back more than 20 years and they have consistently been recognized as top-performers by treasure hunters world-wide.

Having used all of the pulse detectors produced by Garrett starting with the original XL-500 back in the early 1980's, I was anxious to see how the new Advanced Pulse Induction (API) circuitry in the Infinium performed in the field.

Features



Selling A Treasure Tale

By Frank Colletti
From page 27 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


There is one thing that any writer must start with, whether he or she is a future Hemingway who attempted to write the great American novel, or a treasure hunter thinking about writing for this publication. Start with an idea. Think about the stories you have read and which ones you liked, which ones you disliked, and why.What interested you and held you to the end of the story? Was it an adventure story about some long lost treasure? Then perhaps research and relating the history of events are for you.Did you prefer to read about someone’s adventures in locating a long forgotten Civil War encampment?



Oklahoma Outlaws

By John Minges
From page 29 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It is easy to as you read the articles in Lost Treasure to quickly become immersed in a dream-like state as you read the interesting stories and, at times, are challenged to look deeper to understand the past.

As we move through our age of fast pace technology with beepers, cell phones and email, we forget how difficult the struggles to survive must have been in the Wild West. Those once everyday occurrences, many times happening in the work environment, are now obsolete. Have you ever taken a stagecoach ride? Ever been to a hanging? What does a strong box full of $20 gold pieces really look like and how heavy is it? These questions send me back in time reading about cowboys and outlaws as I dug into a Lost Treasure dating March 1987.



Revealing Research: $70,000 Cache In Utah

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 31 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Unlike most Utah towns that historically find their roots in the Mormon development of the state, Corinne was a rail-town laid out in 1869 by the Union Pacific.In her day, Corinne earned its reputation for lawlessness, and was better known as the City of the Ungodly, or Gentile City, by the saints living in neighboring communities.Corinne had what any soiled western town can claim fame to - blacksmiths, newspapers, an opera house, warehouses, a cigar factory, gambling and drinking establishments, a sawmill, and by all means the frequently colorful houses of ill repute.The Union Pacific made Corinne the central rail-hub for both Utah and Idaho commerce.



Black Bart's Booty

By Mary E. Gratti
From page 36 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Somewhere within the peaks and valleys of Northern Californias Mendocino County, secreted away in one or more hiding places by the notorious bad man Black Bart himself, may repose 120-year-old treasure.

Now, for the first time, the facts about this mysterious man may point the way to gold and silver. Charles E. Bowles was born in England in 1829. His family, like countless others, felt a burning desire to improve their lives. They packed up and sailed for America, settling in New York State.



Don't Follow The Crowds

By Andy Sabisch
From page 38 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Does this sound familiar? You and your family are on a long trip and its time to get something to eat. You get off the interstate and see several local restaurants a short distance from the exit. You eye them up and decide to go to the one with the full parking lot; after all, the food has to be good if the locals eat there. While this logic usually works well for picking a restaurant, movie or other attraction, it’s the reverse that will pay off for today’s treasure hunter. When I started swinging a detector back in the mid-1960's, the phrase hunted out had not even been coined yet. Virtually anywhere my father, brother and I searched turned up a wealth of goodies despite using equipment that wouldn’t even pass as a toy today.



Ship Recovery Approved: Excavating The Hms Sussex

By Janet Warford-perry
From page 47 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the early 1870s, two men robbed a military payroll of $72,000 in gold coins near the old station in the Cerat Mountains just outside Kingman, Ariz. It was not long after the holdup that a Calvary patrol stumbled upon the fleeing thieves. A gunfight erupted and one man was killed. The other bandit was captured, and for several days the troopers searched in vain for the hidden loot with no success. The surviving bandit was put in prison where he later died, never revealing the location of the treasure. As far as is known, the gold has never been found. I researched this story in great detail back in 1988. It was a normal blistering hot day in July of that year that I located the remains of the old station.



Stashing A Cache: Would Finding It Be So Easy?

By Michael M. Mosley
From page 50 of the August, 2003 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2003 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


About six years ago, I had an idea that struck me as being a rather unique one. After reading about many caches (and hunting a few) over the years, I felt like it would be interesting to bury one myself. I looked through some of my recovered finds for a few culled pieces of jewelry and several silver coins of little numismatic value. Next, I added some silver-plated spoons and forks, bent double, enabling me to cram it all into a half coffee can. Last, the can was sealed with a wooden plug cut from a board nailed in place all the way around the can. Finally, the loot was buried and a handwritten map of the location was made. Two years passed and I had the idea that finding the cache would be a cinch.