Treasure Caches Of The Zealots

By Gerry Erberich
From page 30 of the September, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In early 1952, a team of archaeologists was inspecting a wadi, or desert canyon, near the Dead Seas northwestern corner in Jordan. Their search had been prompted by the accidental discovery five years earlier of a cave that contained ancient biblical texts which later came to be known as the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Since that famous discovery, many amateur and professional expeditions had scoured the parched land around the Dead Sea in hopes of finding another depository of ancient writings. Due to limited resources, the scientific groups began concentrating their efforts in the Qumran area where the first discovery had been made.



Treasure/Rockhound Ranch Country

By C. Kutac
From page 41 of the September, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Now that the first Treasure/Rockhound Ranch has been established along Blanco Canyon in northwestern New Mexico, treasure hunters will want to know more about the area.

There is so much to see, and so much to do, that it can't be adequately covered in one or even a dozen articles. Here we will deal only with the Navajo Lake area - about 30 miles north of the ranch as the crow flies. Navajo Lake is one of the best fishing spots in New Mexico. Not so well known is the fact that there is much to intrigue the treasure hunter as well.



Questions And Answers

By Maurice Kildare
From page 50 of the September, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Setting out on a raid one day, the Mexicans were attacked and killed by Indians near the mouth of Largo Canyon. One of the bandidos lived long enough to tell a Mexican farmer of the treasure hidden near the old stone house, but so far no one has found it.

Another treasure tale prevalent in Treasure/Rockhound Ranch country is that of a pouch of gold coins believed to be hidden in a cliff overlooking Largo Canyon. An old sheepherder, Pedro Arbuelo, cached his money in the cliff, unaware that his grandson was watching.



Missing Gold Shipment

By James Sanford, Jr.
From page 60 of the September, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the mid-1870s, Gen. John Bidwell was mining gold from his numerous claims in northern California. All of the gold was brought to Bidwell's residence at Rancho Chico, now Chico, California. At his home, Bidwell would melt his gold into small ingots and prepare it for shipment to the U.S. Mint in San Francisco.

It was during one of these shipments that Gen. Bidwell lost a small fortune in gold.
John Bidwell was one of the early California settlers. It was Bidwell, along with Peter Lassen and several other men, who did the original mapping of northern California. For this service each of the men received a large land grant.



Treasure Headlines

By Lost Treasure
From page 65 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Seven workmen stumbled upon a cool $2.4 million in the trunk of an old car. This happened several years ago, but the outcome was only recently reported in the Chicago Sun-Times. The money was turned over to the FBI. Investigation revealed that it belonged to a shady gambler who owed piles of back taxes, so off went the $2.4 million to the IRS. In an excess of gratitude, the IRS rewarded the workmen with $4,590 eachor a total of 1.32 percent of what they turned
in. It was appealed to the Claims Court (that might explain why it has taken so long for the outcome to be reported), which ruled the award amount was en-tirely up to the IRS.
Our thanks for this dubious note of the reward for honesty goes to Ernest J. Boese of Joliet. Ill.



The Sunken Colonial Treasure Ship

By Jeff Ferguson
From page 11 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The captain of the American frigate Defense rested tensely against the portside rail, anxiously watching the gathering storm clouds on the horizon. The knuckles of his right hand were white from his tight grip on a ship's cleat.

His worries were real, for it was winter and the storms that could quickly arise this time of year were terrible and destructive, mercilessly battering any ship unlucky enough to be caught in them.



Fort De La Boulaye's Treasure

By C. Kutac
From page 14 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It has been claimed for nearly three centuries that the site of old Fort de la Boulaye conceals a treasure valued at $160,000. On today's booming gold market, the treasure could be worth a lot more.

The fort was established in February of 1700, and was the first French outpost in what is now the state of Louisiana. On that mid-winter day 275 years ago, on a ridge on the east bank of the Mississippi about 18 leagues from the river's mouth, a party of Frenchmen set to work. They threw together a blockhouse that was 28 feet square and armed it with six cannon. The fort was manned by the 18 soldiers.



Circuit Rider's Missing Money

By Benito Villa
From page 15 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 186,8 an Evangelical Church was founded west of Topeka to bring a measure of religion to the young state of Kansas, which had just passed through a blood-stained history of border warfare.

One year later, a circuit rider from the mission lost a small sack of gold and silver coins while trying to get across Chapman Creek west of Junction City, Kansas. The sum that was lost was parsimonious, admittedly. But at today' s prices those coins could be worth a small fortune to some lucky treasure hunter.



Billy The Kid's Lone Cache

By Ben Townsend
From page 17 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The summer sun burned down on Lincoln, New Mexico, as William H. Bouncy crouched in the second-story window of the courthouse cradling a smoking shotgun in his arms.

Face down on the street below lay the buckshot-pierced body of Deputy Sheriff Bob Ollinger. Sprawled on the back stairway was Deputy J. W. Bell, with a regular little oasis of blood seeping out of the dark hole which Bonney's six-shooter had created in his chest just minutes before.



I Lost A Mine Worth Millions

By Eugene R. Anderson
From page 20 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Only 20 years ago I lost a mine worth millions of dollars. You may say that such a thing cannot happen today, but it did. The rich deposit is still there, awaiting some fortunate person to rediscover it. It would be technically incorrect to say I lost a mine, for it was actually a large placer deposit of uranium.

My discovery of the rich deposit had its beginning in the winter of 1954. The discoveries of Charlie Steen and Vernon Pick were on everyone's minds. They had become millionaires overnight following their discoveries of immensely rich deposits of uranium.



The Lost Logger Cache

By J. W. Beard
From page 23 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Though few are aware of its existence, there is a well-documented and still undiscover-ed cache of gold coins on Vashon Island in Puget Sound, between Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. The treasure is thought to be buried on the banks of Judd Creek near the community of Barton.

The details of this lost treasure center around Lars Hanson, a lumberman who worked in this region in the 1870's. Settling in the community, he married a young Indian girl who was soon assisting him in his business.



They Found Pegleg's Gold

By Gerry Erberich
From page 31 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The vast expanse of arid desert northeast of Indio, California, is no doubt one of the most inhospitable and mysterious regions in North America. Many stories and legends have come out of that parched land, passed down first by Indians, who seldom went there by choice, and later by white men whose craving for precious metals often clouded their otherwise good sense.

Gold found in this harsh country is unique. Pegleg Smith's remarkable nugget was viewed by many after he was found alongside the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks near Walkers Station in the mid-1870's. Smith was near death from dehydration and exposure when he was taken to a hospital in Los Angeles.



Waybill To A Million In Gold

By D. Van Atchley
From page 33 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1890 Burt Pottinger, a Denver newspaperman, told this story in the Denver Republican. Along with the facts of the tale of a lost gold mine, he gave a supposedly excellent waybill. How excellent it was re-mains to be seen to this day!
It seems that in the year 1886, two strangers appeared in the min-ing town of Fulford, near Glenwood Springs, Colorado. At Arthur H. Fulfords ranch, located at the mouth of Brush Creek, they secured horses and began riding along the creek. Three times the two strangers came and went, always riding back up the creek. Each time they were gone for several days.



Idahos Lost Roaring River Gold

By George Ogden
From page 37 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Somewhere near the mouth of Roaring River in Idaho is a rich vein of gold-bearing quartz just waiting to be relocated.

Whoever finds it will do well. It is the sort of ore you can mortar by hand and make money. It is a free-milling ore, brownish quartz laced with gold.

Most lost mine stories grow in retelling over the years. Landmarks change. The names of creeks and even mountains have been changed. But I am going to try to steer you to a place where you have an excellent chance of finding a rich gold vein. Nothing has changed since the man who found it died, not even the story.

To the best of my knowledge, not one person has tried to locate this lost mine since his death. I think I am the last man living to know the facts.



Lost German Treasure In The Berkshire Hills

By Howard M. Duffy
From page 44 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was a hot, steaming month, that July of 1777, and General Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne's British troops had just captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain in northern New York State. American forces had abandoned the fortress when heavy enemy artillery was positioned on two high hills, perfect for raking the colonial garrison.

Morale among the British troops was high as a result of this easy victory, until supplies began to run low. As a consequence, Burgoyne sent a strong force of German mercenaries eastward into Vermont on a foraging expedition. These were Prinz Friedrich's men from the Grand Duchy of Brunswick. They were accustomed to fighting on the plains of Europe, but the American forests presented an unknown and unwelcome fighting environment.



Thomas Jefferson's Lost Virginia Gold Strike

By Eugene R. Anderson
From page 56 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Yes, it's true. Our third President, Thomas Jefferson, found and lost a rich vein of gold along Virginias Rappahannock River in 1782.

An educated man, Jefferson recognized a four pound piece of gold-filled quartz for what it was. He later said that while riding along he noticed a weathered outcrop which glinted bright in the late afternoon sun. Weary from a hard day's ride, he stopped to water his horse and examine the shiny piece of rock.

He immediately realized it was quartz filled wth stringers of gold. Taking a piece along for further examination, he continued toward Monticello, his home in Albemarle County, Virginia.



Where Is The Treasure Of Maine's Mad Baron

By Howard M. Duffy
From page 62 of the August, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was the year 1704. French-Canadians and New Englanders had long been engaged in fierce border skirmishes. One such encounter was an attack by Major Church on the tiny wilderness outpost of Castine in what is now the state of Maine.

The daughter of Jean Vincent de lAbadie, Baron de St. Castine, owner of the settlement, escaped from the crude stockade with a considerable amount of treasure and buried it near the town of Penobscot.

The value of this cache was in excess of several thousands of dollars.

Approximately 2,000 coins were recovered in 1850 by Capt. Stephen Grindle and his son, Samuel. The remainder of the trove is still waiting to be recovered.



Hijacked Bullion Of Central City

By Jeff Ferguson
From page 31 of the July, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Gold was plentiful in the northern reaches of the Black Hills in what is now South Dakota. In fact, it was so plentiful that nearly 3,000 miners were crowded into a group of gulches before they founded the town of Central City in January 1877.

The new city grew rapidly. Sixteen gold stamp mills were erected, four newspapers were established and the town's population soared to 10,000. There were schools, stores, social clubs and fraternal lodges. After a devastating flood in 1883, the citizens rebuilt the town more solidly than ever.



Whartons Buried Bandit Gold

By C Kutac
From page 32 of the July, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Somewhere in northwestern New Mexico's arid wasteland lies a buried trove of $50,000 in gold coins and bullion. At least, that's what it was worth when it was taken at gunpoint from a stagecoach in 1874. Of course, today's prices make the trove's value much higher.

Northwestern New Mexico covers a lot of territory, but there are a few landmarks that narrow the treasure area down to approximately 10 square miles.



Gold Is Anywhere

By John H. Harsison
From page 44 of the July, 1975 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1975 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1929, Bill Hansen, a jacksass prospector, staked out a claim in the Tuscarora Mountains of northeast Nevada. He did some assessment work on it and then sold it to a greenhorn for a paltry $2,000 because he didnt think it was worth a tinker's dam. The greenhorn pecked at it for a while and then abandoned it for the same reason.

Thirty-three years later, Newmont Mining Corporation, a world-wide energy company, acquired the property. Newmont did some core drilling which proved that particular mountain was a massive block of low grade ore. This discovery gave birth to the fabulous Carlin Gold Mine, the second largest gold producer in the United States.