Nothing Lost In Zapotlanejo

By Bob Roach
From page 23 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Im writing this from my cheap, but clean and comfortable motel room in the small town of Zapotlanejo, just outside of Guadalajara, Mexico. I made the 6-hour drive up here yesterday from Mexico City, and will make the return journey on the morrow.

I might venture out for dinner later if my tennis shoes, now propped up against my cars tires outside in the hot parking lot, ever dry off. I washed them in the rooms tiny sink earlier, in a partially successful bid to cleanse off the mud and cow poop acquired from the battlefield of Calderon Bridge.



Spanish Bullion

By Clara Watkins
From page 40 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Mexican said the plat rock indicated there was $60,000,000 in gold bullion buried below, and read the date as 1731.

My grandparents, John and Lucretia Sembritzki, moved from Oklahoma (Indian Territory) in a covered wagon in 1899 and homesteaded a tract of land in Clyde, Callahan County, Texas.

At the southern portion of the land was a plot they referred to as the 80-acre piece. The soil was loose white sand covered with underbrush and an occasional old tree. They figured they were the first to explore the landLucretia especially eager to see it all.



Loss Prevention Tips

By Bob Roach
From page 25 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Bring a friend along on your digging trips 

Maybe you lack the necessary searching skills to locate lost gear, but your buddy might not. My friend, Marc Harmon, once located my lost backpack in some woods long after Id given up the search. 

Use a homing device.  After work one day in England, some friends and I went out hunting with the intention of staying out all afternoon and most of the night. My friend, Jim, had rigged up some sort of small, battery-powered, blinking light contraption, which he placed on my cars roof. When it turned dusk we stopped hunting long enough to return to my auto, whereupon Jim activated his device. It worked splendidly, but a modern GPS system might be tremendously effective.



Treasure Of The Rogues

By Jason Roberts
From page 43 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Taylor found a rich gold pocket in one of the mines and put several sacks of ore in flour sacks, stashing it in an old mineshaft.

The Rouge River Indians settled in the mountains and valleys of what became Jackson County, Oregon long before the Europeans arrived in the New World. Jackson County is located in south central Oregon on the border with California.



Things To Remember

By Michael W Mosley
From page 26 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As a detectorist becomes more involved with the hobby&#44 he or she will begin to realize that there are plenty of things that are helpful to remember.



Grandpa Clark&#39s Gold

By Richard E Jones
From page 46 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For most of 50 years, it was a pastime for his neighbors to go digging for Grandpa Clarks gold.

Over 150 years ago, a happy, grubby 49er stood up from his labor in the muck and mire of his claim and exuberantly declared, Gold is where you find it. Ever since then treasure hunters have said, Good treasure leads are where you find them.

JJs grandpas buried gold is no exception. Admiral Joseph James Clark, who preferred to be called JJ, was the first Cherokee Indian to graduate from the U. S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. Unknown to me at the time, I ran across JJs story at a library book sale thats held every spring. I bought an issue of Life magazine dated January 22, 1945 to commemorate my brothers birthday.



Locating Small Criminal Caches

By Joe Wolfe
From page 28 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Criminals in the 1800's, just as today, stole small sums of money. A robbery from the 1800's does not have to total $10,000 dollars to be worth pursuing. Ten dollars in change from 1800 might now be worth $1,000 today.

With a single 1800 large cent worth perhaps as much as $25 to todays coin collector, what would $10 dollars in change be worth today? Certainly $100 is a small fortune. When it comes to finding coins, I follow the rule, "the older the better." You dont have to find a large cache from the 1800's to find a fortune.



Lake Hunting--worth The Wade

By Launa D. Morphew
From page 31 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Eminent Domain. These are two words we dont often hear anymore. Websters Dictionary defines eminent domain as the right of a state to take private property for public use. In other words, if you got it and the government wants it for public use, they can take it.



Resolution To Document History

By Janet Warford-perry
From page 7 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


With each passing year, or for that matter, each day that goes by, signals a bit of history threatened to be lost forever. In days gone by, a network of family and friends often gathered round big tables or on front porches to share memories, folklore and spin a few yarns. For centuries, local legends were passed on to the next generation only orally. Those folks fortunate enough to have learned to read and write, often kept daily journals of their lives. Others faithfully documented daily living in the form of letters to relatives that had moved a few miles away or across the country. Modern technology and travel have significantly changed the way we communicate as a society. Today, some families only gather at the dinner table once or twice a year instead of on a daily basis.



Understanding Platinum

By John Minges
From page 33 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Platinum is a precious metal few people know much about, and even fewer knowingly own it. (There are traces of platinum in many of the products we buy.) W hen someone says platinum they are usually referring to the metal itself, not the Platinum Group Metals which consist of platinum, palladium, rhodium, iridium, ruthenium and osmium metals. Most people when hearing the word think of it in the context of a platinum record albums or even a platinum credit card.



Research Tips

By Anthony Belli
From page 8 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Back in the days before metal detectors, treasure hunters depended much more on research to direct them to a specific search area. Once there, they would determine where to dig by reading the geographic features of the land, taking note of all artificial features as well.Once target areas were identified, the treasure hunter would thrust a pole, sharpened to a point at one end, into the ground. If the pole struck an object it was dug up. Although primitive, many a cache was unearthed using this method.I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen it - someone I know goes out and drops a lot of money on a fine detector. Then as I watch them unpack the beast I hear tall tales about how any day now they plan to unearth Montezuma’s buried hoard.



Affordable Gold

By John Minges
From page 35 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Buying gold is not for the individual looking to get rich quick. If youre like me, Ive spent hours looking on the Internet for information on ways to buy gold cheaply, including recycling gold.

Gold, silver as well as other precious metals like platinum is sold based on bullion value. This value is referred to as the spot price, which means the current market value for bullion at that moment in time. A good source for finding out the current price of precious metals is at: http://www.kitconet.com/.



Strategic Value Of Silver

By John Minges
From page 10 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Many people have been lulled into thinking silver is a precious metal. But the question remains, is it really that precious, and does it make sense to own Silver Eagles or silver bullion at all?Looking back in history, you will find that the U.S. stockpile inventory in 1981 of silver was 139.5 million ounces, and Congress authorized a series of auctions to sell off the entire inventory over a three-year period - 105 million ounces - to raise funds for purchase of other critical and strategic materials.However, at that time congressmen from the silver mining states resisted the liquidation of the silver stockpile and delayed the entire liquidation for several years.



Susquehannocks' Cannons

By Roy A. Decker
From page 7 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over the years, Hollywood has frequently portrayed the Native American tribes as poor, ignorant painted savages, armed and equipped poorly and living as nomads. In the case of some of the eastern tribes, nothing could be further from the truth! One tribe had a system of writing in hieroglyphs; (which remain un-deciphered to this day) lived in rather permanent towns that were fortified and surrounded with a log palisade; governed themselves with a system similar to that used by the United States today, and were armed with some of the best weaponry to be had for their time.



Coin Reference Materials

By Frank J. Colletti
From page 38 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


So, you want to start a coin collection, and have decided to graduate from a coin accumulator or hoarder to a coin collector.

Where do you start? As with any collecting endeavor, the standard line of instruction is buy the book before the coin. There are dozens of references on the market for the collector, and for now, we will deal with the standard references that all collectors should have for their libraries.

Traditionally, to begin with, most collectors purchase the A Guide Book of United States Coins by R.S. Yeoman, edited by Kenneth Bressett.



Extreme Detecting: The Cure For Cabin Fever

By Eric Ellis And Gary Lee Hicks
From page 14 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Enjoying metal detecting as a year around hobby can be an invigorating challenge here in Southern Ohio. We had our fill of research and wandering the local libraries. There were no more county records to probe and a fresh layer of snow kept us two more inches away from our goal of treasure. The need for fresh air, sweat and dirty hands started to become an obsession. Eric and I had been digging friends for over twenty years and had shared many fields of dreams.



The Top Mining Compnay

By Resti Concoles
From page 13 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


During the latter part of October 1881, two men, Henry Corey and Ralph Gaines, stole eight gold bars from the Tip Top Mining Company near the town of Gillette, Arizona.

A few months later, Corey and Gaines held up a stagecoach on the main road a few miles west of Flagstaff, netting $25,000 in gold and silver coins. The Phoenix Herald newspaper carried both stories and placed a value of $160,000 on the eight gold bars.



10 Terrific Tips For Nugget Shooters

By James E. Mulkey, Jr.
From page 8 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Buy the Right Detector

All too many people try to save a few dollars by using a 10 to 20-year-old detector to search for nuggets. What they hope to find are thousands of dollars worth of nuggets using yesterdays technology.

Why hesitate to spend $1,000 to $2,000 on a top-of-the-line gold detector when the nuggets youll find easily sell for two to three times the spot price for gold?



Protecting A Valuable Cache

By Matt Blackman
From page 41 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


There are 2.1 million burglars each year in the United States, most being perpetrated by amateur thieves, many needing drug money, looking to grab whatever they can fast! Burglars, simply put, are looking for homes they can enter and leave quickly while avoiding detection.

Most burglaries take place during the daytime work hours, and experts believe that 90% of these crimes could be prevented.

Before becoming too paranoid, realize that every stranger in your neighborhood is not a criminal. Also realize that if a criminal looked like a criminal, no one would have any trouble spotting them! So use reasonable caution but just dont over do it.



The Treasure Hunter All Vision Pro & Md-3010

By Andy Sabisch
From page 26 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Its been a while since a new metal detector brand has come on the market so when I got a call from Lost Treasure about testing a pair of detectors from a new company I was interested in seeing them.

Chapmans LT Plus was founded in 1995 with the goal of providing low cost, high quality electronics to the US market, with a series of metal detectors included in their product line.

Features

The All-Vision Pro & MD-3010 detectors have been designed to provide features sought by todays treasure hunters. For example, visual target ID is a feature many coin & beach hunters find extremely useful but is typically not found on sub-$200 detectors.