Metal Detecting 101

By Charles A. Cummins
From page 12 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I am a retired educator and finally got to realize a long-time dream when I purchased my Whites XLT last year. Retirement allowed me the time to pursue my various interests and metal detecting was one of them. When I got the box containing my Whites XLT home, I eagerly opened it, read the assembly instructions, placed the headphones on my head and headed for the backyard. My education began.



Ghost Town Tips And Techniques

By Deirdre Garrett
From page 48 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure is where you find itin a ghost town or anywhere else. You can diligently seek treasure or you can stumble upon it. The choice is yours. You will increase your chances of finding valuable items one thousand percent if you take the time to properly research your projects beforehand. Without research, treasure discovery comes only by pure luck, and the treasure you may find may have little value.

There are some general techniques that will be a good starting point for your research.



Lost Gold In The North Star Mine

By Reggie Gould
From page 23 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Northeast of Sacramento, California, higher in the Sierra foothills than Coloma, the city known to 19th century California gold seekers as the modern day El Dorado, is a fertile little area called Garden Valley. Some of the disappointed and discouraged miners who came to this area but ran out of money and food after a few months of searching vainly for gold, decided there might be an income to be made by growing food. This is how Garden Valley, sitting on a slope between Georgetown and the gold boomtown of Coloma, got its name.



Loomis Gang Loot

By Anthony J Pallante
From page 26 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Horse theft was an enterprise for which

the whole family seemed to have considerable aptitude.

In 1865, nearly 40 years of criminal activity caught up with George Washington Loomis, Jr. In all likelihood, Wash was not too concerned when the vigilantes first descended on the Loomis farm on the west side of Nine Mile Swamp near Sangerfield.

After all, he and his brothers had been through this before.



Twelve Essential Survival Tools

By George Hurteau
From page 14 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Ask any seasoned prospector or treasure hunter and, chances are, theyll tell you that what drew them into the hobby is the solitary time spent in remote wilderness locations. Its because of this challenge to find the place that no one else has been before we spend a great deal of time alone in the field.

With all the solitary time we spend in the outdoors, it makes good sense that we should be prepared for any situation that could arise. As treasure hunters, we also spend a good deal of time planning our hunts with meticulous detail. Part of this planning should include preparation for emergencies.



Lead Vs Gold And Garnets

By Gerry Edwards
From page 4 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was a glorious fall day and I decided to head out to a place called White Rock just west of Mariposa&#44 California&#44 located only five miles from my house.



Hypothermia And Cold Shock: The Risks Of Off-season Hunting

By Dave Rieden
From page 28 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The warm weather treasure hunters and anglers have left the water and are dreaming of the spring season. The crowds are gone from the local waters during the colder months of the year leaving only the wind to ripple the surface. A few die-hard fishermen and treasure hunters still work their favorite spots, enjoying the peace and quiet. Bundled up against the cold, waterfowl hunters also take advantage of the now nearly empty waterways. The crisp clear days of the cold weather seasons are the best of times for many.



Assayer&#39s Stolen Gold Bars

By James E Mulkey, Jr
From page 29 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


He systematically hid a few of the gold bars,
and doctored the company books to cover his tracks.

The Spaniards were the first to discover and mine for placer gold in the Picacho mining district in 1778. Later, during the 1860s, Mexican and American prospectors recovered gold in the district through dry washing techniques.



True Crime - If It&#39s Old&#44 It Can Be Sold

By Anthony M Belli
From page 17 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lets say one day youre out treasure hunting and stumble upon this sacred stone Can you tell me what it means? Is it art, or ancient technology? How old is it? How much is it worth? I wonder how would it look in my front yard? Is this treasure hunting? So what separates treasure hunters from looters, vandals and grave robbers-respect for the law.

When I began treasure hunting in 1983, it never crossed my mind that looting archeological sites and robbing human graves would be involved, so when I hear the term treasure hunter so casually thrown in with grave robbers, vandals, looters, and pot hunters, it offends me.



Mine Of The Lost Souls: New Clues May Lead To Lost Mine

By Joe Meis
From page 39 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you dont have all the pieces to the puzzle, the puzzle isnt complete! Long ago, before the Indian uprisings drove the Spaniards from the mountains and burned the old forts from the Uinta Basin in Utah, a rich mine was worked in a canyon whose landmarks were peculiar to that canyon alone. Famed lost treasure author Michael Paul Henson wrote in his book Americas Lost Treasure that this is a lost gold mine with a cache of silver bars nearby. Yet writer George A. Thompson penned in his book Some Dreams Die that this lost mine is silver. Most of the miners were killed and their bodies thrown into the mineshafts.



Charles Hardin&#39s Amazing Find

By Steve Hathcock
From page 32 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


By the outbreak of the Civil War, John and his sons had accumulated quite a fortune.

The United States was in the grip of the Great Depression during the Fall of 1931. Soup lines were a common sight in the bigger cities. Folk singer Woody Guthrie rode the rails, singing of family farms, inundated by solid walls of swirling dirt that sprang up from the parched prairie lands of the Midwest. In Oklahoma, entire families were abandoning their homesteads and heading west, seeking a haven in California.



Just Looking Around

By Michael W. Mosley
From page 19 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over the past 19 years, Ive owned quite a few detectors, many of the leading brands that regularly get advertised in the treasure magazines. Ive had TR units, pulse units, and the ever so popular and trusty VLF units, using big coils, little coils and medium-sized coils. Some of the detectors were for searching on land; others were designed primarily for hunting in water.

Even with all the modern technology available, I still believe one, or should I say two, of the most important tools a treasure seeker can use are his or her eyes. Many notable facts can be ascertained about a site by simply looking it over.

Ask yourself if anything looks out of place. Look at the site with earlier times in mind.



Winter Hunting: Finding Treasure During The Holiday Season

By James E. Mulkey, Jr.
From page 46 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


By the time January rolls around you can be sure that winters snow, along with freezing temperatures, will put a stop to most coin and cache hunting. You may prefer to stay inside while the snow flies, warm and toasty in front of the fireplace. Later that evening, while watching an episode of Survivor that was filmed in the tropics, you begin to daydream of hunting for Spanish pieces of eight with your new metal detector along the shores of a Caribbean island. Your dream is quickly shattered when the doorbell rings. Cheer up; maybe its the folks from Publishers Clearing House alerting you to the fact that youre the nations newest millionaire! A scurrilous breeze sweeps past you and fills your home with cold air when you open the door.



Sheep Creek Murderers

By John Gaudet
From page 36 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Beneath the barn were entrances into further mazes of tunnels that eventually led to a wooded area where a strong door like structure lay hidden beneath the foliage.

Canada has had its share of reprehensible crimes and outlaws but a bizarre and tragic series of events set in motion on a little farm at Steep Creek, in Saskatchewan on November 15, 1918 spread shock waves across Canada when, with the killing of a sheriffs deputy, a twisted scheme came to light.

It started with charges of murder, sodomy, draft evasion, petty rustling, arson and theft. It ended in the first and only triple hanging in Canadian criminal history. What made the case even more bizarre were the allegations of Mind control, drug addictions and wild sexual perversions.



Treasure Hunting Begins Early On

By Michael Edwards, Ma, Ches
From page 21 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Some of the most exciting times I remember growing up in the piedmont area of North Carolina involved hunting for treasure. It was way before I learned that the area was near where the first gold rush in the USA took place. The areas around Gold Hill, Cabarrus and Stanley County have come alive again in recent years, catering to those who are interested in knowing more about history and Americas first gold discovery.



Good Techniques For Searching And Researching

By Andy Sabisch
From page 54 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The format of this months column is a bit different than my usual columns in that it covers two entirely different topics. The reason I picked these two subjects is based on the number of similar questions Ive received recently pertaining to them. The first topic is that of batteries.



Spanish Bullion

By Clara Watkins
From page 40 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Mexican said the plat rock indicated there was $60,000,000 in gold bullion buried below, and read the date as 1731.

My grandparents, John and Lucretia Sembritzki, moved from Oklahoma (Indian Territory) in a covered wagon in 1899 and homesteaded a tract of land in Clyde, Callahan County, Texas.

At the southern portion of the land was a plot they referred to as the eighty acre piece. The soil was loose, white sand covered with underbrush and an occasional old tree. They figured they were the first to explore the land Lucretia especially eager to see it all.



Nothing Lost In Zapotlanejo

By Bob Roach
From page 23 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Im writing this from my cheap, but clean and comfortable motel room in the small town of Zapotlanejo, just outside of Guadalajara, Mexico. I made the 6-hour drive up here yesterday from Mexico City, and will make the return journey on the morrow.

I might venture out for dinner later if my tennis shoes, now propped up against my cars tires outside in the hot parking lot, ever dry off. I washed them in the rooms tiny sink earlier, in a partially successful bid to cleanse off the mud and cow poop acquired from the battlefield of Calderon Bridge.



Treasure Stories To Research

By Ettore And Diana Nannetti
From page 56 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 31 years of treasure hunting and 18 as fulltime metal detector dealers, we have heard enough treasure stories to fill several books. In this span of time we have crammed several large boxes with newspaper clippings, handwritten notes, and most of all first hand information related to us by other treasure hunters, researchers, and everyone else who has told us treasure stories, some of who had actually searched for these treasures.

Some of the information may be vague or hard to substantiate without further research, but here they are as they were told to us. Delaware Coin Beach The famous beach, which is strategically located immediately north of the Indian River Inlet Bridge, has produced more colonial period coins than any other beach in the United States.



Spanish Bullion

By Clara Watkins
From page 40 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Mexican said the plat rock indicated there was $60,000,000 in gold bullion buried below, and read the date as 1731.

My grandparents, John and Lucretia Sembritzki, moved from Oklahoma (Indian Territory) in a covered wagon in 1899 and homesteaded a tract of land in Clyde, Callahan County, Texas.

At the southern portion of the land was a plot they referred to as the 80-acre piece. The soil was loose white sand covered with underbrush and an occasional old tree. They figured they were the first to explore the landLucretia especially eager to see it all.