Affordable Gold

By John Minges
From page 35 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Buying gold is not for the individual looking to get rich quick. If youre like me, Ive spent hours looking on the Internet for information on ways to buy gold cheaply, including recycling gold.

Gold, silver as well as other precious metals like platinum is sold based on bullion value. This value is referred to as the spot price, which means the current market value for bullion at that moment in time. A good source for finding out the current price of precious metals is at: http://www.kitconet.com/.



Research Tips

By Anthony Belli
From page 8 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Back in the days before metal detectors, treasure hunters depended much more on research to direct them to a specific search area. Once there, they would determine where to dig by reading the geographic features of the land, taking note of all artificial features as well.Once target areas were identified, the treasure hunter would thrust a pole, sharpened to a point at one end, into the ground. If the pole struck an object it was dug up. Although primitive, many a cache was unearthed using this method.I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen it - someone I know goes out and drops a lot of money on a fine detector. Then as I watch them unpack the beast I hear tall tales about how any day now they plan to unearth Montezuma’s buried hoard.



Susquehannocks' Cannons

By Roy A. Decker
From page 7 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over the years, Hollywood has frequently portrayed the Native American tribes as poor, ignorant painted savages, armed and equipped poorly and living as nomads. In the case of some of the eastern tribes, nothing could be further from the truth! One tribe had a system of writing in hieroglyphs; (which remain un-deciphered to this day) lived in rather permanent towns that were fortified and surrounded with a log palisade; governed themselves with a system similar to that used by the United States today, and were armed with some of the best weaponry to be had for their time.



Coin Reference Materials

By Frank J. Colletti
From page 38 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


So, you want to start a coin collection, and have decided to graduate from a coin accumulator or hoarder to a coin collector.

Where do you start? As with any collecting endeavor, the standard line of instruction is buy the book before the coin. There are dozens of references on the market for the collector, and for now, we will deal with the standard references that all collectors should have for their libraries.

Traditionally, to begin with, most collectors purchase the A Guide Book of United States Coins by R.S. Yeoman, edited by Kenneth Bressett.



Strategic Value Of Silver

By John Minges
From page 10 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Many people have been lulled into thinking silver is a precious metal. But the question remains, is it really that precious, and does it make sense to own Silver Eagles or silver bullion at all?Looking back in history, you will find that the U.S. stockpile inventory in 1981 of silver was 139.5 million ounces, and Congress authorized a series of auctions to sell off the entire inventory over a three-year period - 105 million ounces - to raise funds for purchase of other critical and strategic materials.However, at that time congressmen from the silver mining states resisted the liquidation of the silver stockpile and delayed the entire liquidation for several years.



10 Terrific Tips For Nugget Shooters

By James E. Mulkey, Jr.
From page 8 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Buy the Right Detector

All too many people try to save a few dollars by using a 10 to 20-year-old detector to search for nuggets. What they hope to find are thousands of dollars worth of nuggets using yesterdays technology.

Why hesitate to spend $1,000 to $2,000 on a top-of-the-line gold detector when the nuggets youll find easily sell for two to three times the spot price for gold?



Protecting A Valuable Cache

By Matt Blackman
From page 41 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


There are 2.1 million burglars each year in the United States, most being perpetrated by amateur thieves, many needing drug money, looking to grab whatever they can fast! Burglars, simply put, are looking for homes they can enter and leave quickly while avoiding detection.

Most burglaries take place during the daytime work hours, and experts believe that 90% of these crimes could be prevented.

Before becoming too paranoid, realize that every stranger in your neighborhood is not a criminal. Also realize that if a criminal looked like a criminal, no one would have any trouble spotting them! So use reasonable caution but just dont over do it.



The Treasure Hunter All Vision Pro & Md-3010

By Andy Sabisch
From page 26 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Its been a while since a new metal detector brand has come on the market so when I got a call from Lost Treasure about testing a pair of detectors from a new company I was interested in seeing them.

Chapmans LT Plus was founded in 1995 with the goal of providing low cost, high quality electronics to the US market, with a series of metal detectors included in their product line.

Features

The All-Vision Pro & MD-3010 detectors have been designed to provide features sought by todays treasure hunters. For example, visual target ID is a feature many coin & beach hunters find extremely useful but is typically not found on sub-$200 detectors.



Extreme Detecting: The Cure For Cabin Fever

By Eric Ellis And Gary Lee Hicks
From page 14 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Enjoying metal detecting as a year around hobby can be an invigorating challenge here in Southern Ohio. We had our fill of research and wandering the local libraries. There were no more county records to probe and a fresh layer of snow kept us two more inches away from our goal of treasure. The need for fresh air, sweat and dirty hands started to become an obsession. Eric and I had been digging friends for over twenty years and had shared many fields of dreams.



The Top Mining Compnay

By Resti Concoles
From page 13 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


During the latter part of October 1881, two men, Henry Corey and Ralph Gaines, stole eight gold bars from the Tip Top Mining Company near the town of Gillette, Arizona.

A few months later, Corey and Gaines held up a stagecoach on the main road a few miles west of Flagstaff, netting $25,000 in gold and silver coins. The Phoenix Herald newspaper carried both stories and placed a value of $160,000 on the eight gold bars.



Field Trip Tips

By Illinois And Iowa Treasure Hunter's Club
From page 10 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Spray some WD-40 on digging tools for better use in hard ground. It will keep tools from rusting, too.

An eyeglass case with a belt clip is a great way to carry extra batteries. The weight is negligible when clipped to the belt.

To keep a scoop afloat, make your own floaty. If using the long handle-type that is used like a shovel, put some foam pipe insulation on the handle to add flotation. This will make the scoop handle float up for easy grabbing instead of sinking. Foam pipe insulation can be purchased at most hardware stores.

Practice retrieving objects in your own yard before making a bad name for yourself on someone elses property.



The True Spirit Of Treasure

By Mark Dillenbeck
From page 43 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Once again the token round and shiny Has been discreetly buried in the ground. It lies with trees growing large all about Waiting quietly and patiently to be found. Jeepers creepers, golly gosh what do I see But lots and lots of rocks all around. Now not the rocks but tween the posts Its 1995 and 1000s of cars zipping around. Keep your eye peeled for traffic, your attention center- Most to the wooden sentinels for the token to be found.



Successful Research: Proven Methods Of Reseraching Treasure

By Diane Leek
From page 19 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Whenever I begin a new research project, I get all excited because I know a new adventure is beginning. In the quest for knowledge, I am always doing some kind of research, either new or on-going.

Some amount of research is needed in nearly every treasure hunt, whether it will be to find the best route to travel, the nearest ghost town, or the history of a local park. The first place I always start is the library where there is a wealth of information to be gathered. Begin by asking the librarian, since they are very knowledgeable, after all, that is what they studied. The librarian isnt interested in beating you to a ghost town or possible treasure load, so feel free to ask for specific historical information.



Canyon Diablo Stage Robbery

By Margaret Lewis
From page 17 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On May 20, 1852, Henry Wells and William Fargo formed Wells Fargo and Company. The stagecoach became the primary means of transportation. After the Civil War, thousands of people headed west to make their fortunes. Most came by wagon train or stagecoach. Since it took several months to go westward by ship and by wagon train, the need for stagecoach travel was critical.



The Gold Coin

By James C. Davis
From page 11 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I bet you will never guess what I got with my metal detector today. If, by some wild quirk of chance, you would have guessed an 1880, $10 gold piece, and Eagle, you would have been absolutely correct.

Several questions quickly arise. Was I just lucky? Was I searching in a honey hole? Am I just skilled in metal detecting? Am I just a wonderful guy? Well, the answer to all these questions is yes. However, carefully note I did not say, I found a gold coin with my metal detector. I said I got one with the aid of my metal detector. Only a lowbred, bottom dwelling scum sucker would purposely mislead folks. What I did do, however, was come with a great and original new idea. At least I thought it was a great and original new idea.



Hunting Battlefields

By Deirdre Garrett
From page 46 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Civil War was one of the most fascinating and emotional episodes in American history. It was one of the few American military actions that actually took place on U.S. soil, which is perhaps why it attracts considerable interest, even today, more than 100 years later.



Romance Of The Lost

By Dick Dalby
From page 22 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Why do we hunt for lost treasure in all its forms? There is, of course, the eternal lure of the treasure, whether seeking a forgotten cache of gold coins a fabled lost mine, or a streak of color in the bottom of a gold pan.

The lure is there, even if youre just shooting for coins in a vacant lot. But theres a lot more to treasure hunting than just the possibility of monetary reward, as nice as that would certainly be for most of us. There is always the romance and adventure of the search itself. I think thats what a lot of treasure hunters, maybe most of us, find so appealing about the hobby. To some extent, a treasure hunter is a historian.



Curious Tale Of Oscar Beckwith

By Paul D Bloom
From page 21 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


An armed robber and sneak thief, debaucher of young women, murderer and self-proclaimed cannibal, Beckwith was not the kind of person anyone with half a brain would choose to swindle.

In the depth of the fierce Canadian winter, a semi-literate old man drew is pad of paper closer and began to write (see inset) Folding the letter carefully and placing it in his safe, the sheriff of Columbia County turned to his assembled deputies and announced simply, Boys, I think we got him.

Today however, there are probably only a handful of individuals who are aware that in 1885, an unholy mix of gold mining and cannibalism occurred in the little town of Austerlitz, along the New York-Massachusetts state borders.



Metal Detecting 101

By Charles A. Cummins
From page 12 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I am a retired educator and finally got to realize a long-time dream when I purchased my Whites XLT last year. Retirement allowed me the time to pursue my various interests and metal detecting was one of them. When I got the box containing my Whites XLT home, I eagerly opened it, read the assembly instructions, placed the headphones on my head and headed for the backyard. My education began.



Ghost Town Tips And Techniques

By Deirdre Garrett
From page 48 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure is where you find itin a ghost town or anywhere else. You can diligently seek treasure or you can stumble upon it. The choice is yours. You will increase your chances of finding valuable items one thousand percent if you take the time to properly research your projects beforehand. Without research, treasure discovery comes only by pure luck, and the treasure you may find may have little value.

There are some general techniques that will be a good starting point for your research.