Assayer&#39s Stolen Gold Bars

By James E Mulkey, Jr
From page 29 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


He systematically hid a few of the gold bars,
and doctored the company books to cover his tracks.

The Spaniards were the first to discover and mine for placer gold in the Picacho mining district in 1778. Later, during the 1860s, Mexican and American prospectors recovered gold in the district through dry washing techniques.



True Crime - If It&#39s Old&#44 It Can Be Sold

By Anthony M Belli
From page 17 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lets say one day youre out treasure hunting and stumble upon this sacred stone Can you tell me what it means? Is it art, or ancient technology? How old is it? How much is it worth? I wonder how would it look in my front yard? Is this treasure hunting? So what separates treasure hunters from looters, vandals and grave robbers-respect for the law.

When I began treasure hunting in 1983, it never crossed my mind that looting archeological sites and robbing human graves would be involved, so when I hear the term treasure hunter so casually thrown in with grave robbers, vandals, looters, and pot hunters, it offends me.



Winter Hunting: Finding Treasure During The Holiday Season

By James E. Mulkey, Jr.
From page 46 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


By the time January rolls around you can be sure that winters snow, along with freezing temperatures, will put a stop to most coin and cache hunting. You may prefer to stay inside while the snow flies, warm and toasty in front of the fireplace. Later that evening, while watching an episode of Survivor that was filmed in the tropics, you begin to daydream of hunting for Spanish pieces of eight with your new metal detector along the shores of a Caribbean island. Your dream is quickly shattered when the doorbell rings. Cheer up; maybe its the folks from Publishers Clearing House alerting you to the fact that youre the nations newest millionaire! A scurrilous breeze sweeps past you and fills your home with cold air when you open the door.



Charles Hardin&#39s Amazing Find

By Steve Hathcock
From page 32 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


By the outbreak of the Civil War, John and his sons had accumulated quite a fortune.

The United States was in the grip of the Great Depression during the Fall of 1931. Soup lines were a common sight in the bigger cities. Folk singer Woody Guthrie rode the rails, singing of family farms, inundated by solid walls of swirling dirt that sprang up from the parched prairie lands of the Midwest. In Oklahoma, entire families were abandoning their homesteads and heading west, seeking a haven in California.



Just Looking Around

By Michael W. Mosley
From page 19 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Over the past 19 years, Ive owned quite a few detectors, many of the leading brands that regularly get advertised in the treasure magazines. Ive had TR units, pulse units, and the ever so popular and trusty VLF units, using big coils, little coils and medium-sized coils. Some of the detectors were for searching on land; others were designed primarily for hunting in water.

Even with all the modern technology available, I still believe one, or should I say two, of the most important tools a treasure seeker can use are his or her eyes. Many notable facts can be ascertained about a site by simply looking it over.

Ask yourself if anything looks out of place. Look at the site with earlier times in mind.



Good Techniques For Searching And Researching

By Andy Sabisch
From page 54 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The format of this months column is a bit different than my usual columns in that it covers two entirely different topics. The reason I picked these two subjects is based on the number of similar questions Ive received recently pertaining to them. The first topic is that of batteries.



Sheep Creek Murderers

By John Gaudet
From page 36 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Beneath the barn were entrances into further mazes of tunnels that eventually led to a wooded area where a strong door like structure lay hidden beneath the foliage.

Canada has had its share of reprehensible crimes and outlaws but a bizarre and tragic series of events set in motion on a little farm at Steep Creek, in Saskatchewan on November 15, 1918 spread shock waves across Canada when, with the killing of a sheriffs deputy, a twisted scheme came to light.

It started with charges of murder, sodomy, draft evasion, petty rustling, arson and theft. It ended in the first and only triple hanging in Canadian criminal history. What made the case even more bizarre were the allegations of Mind control, drug addictions and wild sexual perversions.



Treasure Hunting Begins Early On

By Michael Edwards, Ma, Ches
From page 21 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Some of the most exciting times I remember growing up in the piedmont area of North Carolina involved hunting for treasure. It was way before I learned that the area was near where the first gold rush in the USA took place. The areas around Gold Hill, Cabarrus and Stanley County have come alive again in recent years, catering to those who are interested in knowing more about history and Americas first gold discovery.



Treasure Stories To Research

By Ettore And Diana Nannetti
From page 56 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 31 years of treasure hunting and 18 as fulltime metal detector dealers, we have heard enough treasure stories to fill several books. In this span of time we have crammed several large boxes with newspaper clippings, handwritten notes, and most of all first hand information related to us by other treasure hunters, researchers, and everyone else who has told us treasure stories, some of who had actually searched for these treasures.

Some of the information may be vague or hard to substantiate without further research, but here they are as they were told to us. Delaware Coin Beach The famous beach, which is strategically located immediately north of the Indian River Inlet Bridge, has produced more colonial period coins than any other beach in the United States.



Spanish Bullion

By Clara Watkins
From page 40 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Mexican said the plat rock indicated there was $60,000,000 in gold bullion buried below, and read the date as 1731.

My grandparents, John and Lucretia Sembritzki, moved from Oklahoma (Indian Territory) in a covered wagon in 1899 and homesteaded a tract of land in Clyde, Callahan County, Texas.

At the southern portion of the land was a plot they referred to as the eighty acre piece. The soil was loose, white sand covered with underbrush and an occasional old tree. They figured they were the first to explore the land Lucretia especially eager to see it all.



Nothing Lost In Zapotlanejo

By Bob Roach
From page 23 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Im writing this from my cheap, but clean and comfortable motel room in the small town of Zapotlanejo, just outside of Guadalajara, Mexico. I made the 6-hour drive up here yesterday from Mexico City, and will make the return journey on the morrow.

I might venture out for dinner later if my tennis shoes, now propped up against my cars tires outside in the hot parking lot, ever dry off. I washed them in the rooms tiny sink earlier, in a partially successful bid to cleanse off the mud and cow poop acquired from the battlefield of Calderon Bridge.



Spanish Bullion

By Clara Watkins
From page 40 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Mexican said the plat rock indicated there was $60,000,000 in gold bullion buried below, and read the date as 1731.

My grandparents, John and Lucretia Sembritzki, moved from Oklahoma (Indian Territory) in a covered wagon in 1899 and homesteaded a tract of land in Clyde, Callahan County, Texas.

At the southern portion of the land was a plot they referred to as the 80-acre piece. The soil was loose white sand covered with underbrush and an occasional old tree. They figured they were the first to explore the landLucretia especially eager to see it all.



Loss Prevention Tips

By Bob Roach
From page 25 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Bring a friend along on your digging trips 

Maybe you lack the necessary searching skills to locate lost gear, but your buddy might not. My friend, Marc Harmon, once located my lost backpack in some woods long after Id given up the search. 

Use a homing device.  After work one day in England, some friends and I went out hunting with the intention of staying out all afternoon and most of the night. My friend, Jim, had rigged up some sort of small, battery-powered, blinking light contraption, which he placed on my cars roof. When it turned dusk we stopped hunting long enough to return to my auto, whereupon Jim activated his device. It worked splendidly, but a modern GPS system might be tremendously effective.



Treasure Of The Rogues

By Jason Roberts
From page 43 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Taylor found a rich gold pocket in one of the mines and put several sacks of ore in flour sacks, stashing it in an old mineshaft.

The Rouge River Indians settled in the mountains and valleys of what became Jackson County, Oregon long before the Europeans arrived in the New World. Jackson County is located in south central Oregon on the border with California.



Things To Remember

By Michael W Mosley
From page 26 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As a detectorist becomes more involved with the hobby&#44 he or she will begin to realize that there are plenty of things that are helpful to remember.



Grandpa Clark&#39s Gold

By Richard E Jones
From page 46 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Cache
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For most of 50 years, it was a pastime for his neighbors to go digging for Grandpa Clarks gold.

Over 150 years ago, a happy, grubby 49er stood up from his labor in the muck and mire of his claim and exuberantly declared, Gold is where you find it. Ever since then treasure hunters have said, Good treasure leads are where you find them.

JJs grandpas buried gold is no exception. Admiral Joseph James Clark, who preferred to be called JJ, was the first Cherokee Indian to graduate from the U. S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. Unknown to me at the time, I ran across JJs story at a library book sale thats held every spring. I bought an issue of Life magazine dated January 22, 1945 to commemorate my brothers birthday.



Locating Small Criminal Caches

By Joe Wolfe
From page 28 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Criminals in the 1800's, just as today, stole small sums of money. A robbery from the 1800's does not have to total $10,000 dollars to be worth pursuing. Ten dollars in change from 1800 might now be worth $1,000 today.

With a single 1800 large cent worth perhaps as much as $25 to todays coin collector, what would $10 dollars in change be worth today? Certainly $100 is a small fortune. When it comes to finding coins, I follow the rule, "the older the better." You dont have to find a large cache from the 1800's to find a fortune.



Lake Hunting--worth The Wade

By Launa D. Morphew
From page 31 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Eminent Domain. These are two words we dont often hear anymore. Websters Dictionary defines eminent domain as the right of a state to take private property for public use. In other words, if you got it and the government wants it for public use, they can take it.



Resolution To Document History

By Janet Warford-perry
From page 7 of the January, 2004 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


With each passing year, or for that matter, each day that goes by, signals a bit of history threatened to be lost forever. In days gone by, a network of family and friends often gathered round big tables or on front porches to share memories, folklore and spin a few yarns. For centuries, local legends were passed on to the next generation only orally. Those folks fortunate enough to have learned to read and write, often kept daily journals of their lives. Others faithfully documented daily living in the form of letters to relatives that had moved a few miles away or across the country. Modern technology and travel have significantly changed the way we communicate as a society. Today, some families only gather at the dinner table once or twice a year instead of on a daily basis.



Understanding Platinum

By John Minges
From page 33 of the January, 2004 issue of Treasure Facts
Copyright © 2004 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Platinum is a precious metal few people know much about, and even fewer knowingly own it. (There are traces of platinum in many of the products we buy.) W hen someone says platinum they are usually referring to the metal itself, not the Platinum Group Metals which consist of platinum, palladium, rhodium, iridium, ruthenium and osmium metals. Most people when hearing the word think of it in the context of a platinum record albums or even a platinum credit card.