Civic Patrol

By Celine Buffett
From page 56 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Our first Civic Patrol story this month comes from Dean “Deano” Ricker, President of the Siouxland Metal Detecting and Archeological Club (SMDAC). The unique adventure is best told in Dean’s own words.
He said, "I would like to start by saying that this is as much a story of a friendship that has been forged through the hobby of metal detecting as much as it is about the final and most unusual hunt of our first season hunting together.
"I am the president of our local metal detecting club and I met Ray Turner at one of the monthly SMDAC meetings.



How To Boost Your Coin Shooting Enthusiasm

By Tom Vance
From page 24 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Visiting with long-time treasure hunter Tommy Walls, I asked him if there was one particular find he prized more than anything else in his valuable collection of coin shooting finds.
Without batting an eye, he quickly answered, “Yes, I guess there is. That would be an 1892 “O” dime I found down in Alabama.”
I was interviewing Tommy in his home in Mannford, Oklahoma, about his many years as an avid coin hunter.
He had worked for the same steel company I had retired from in Sand Springs, Oklahoma. He continued with his recollection of finding that most valuable dime.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 42 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


(There is a) possible gold or silver bullion ship in Lake Michigan. Any further information on it?
Thanks,
Jon MacVean, Via e-mail



State Treasure - Illinois

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lost Treasures of Burrows Cave
RICHLAND COUNTY - The Burrows Cave mystery has been at the center of controversy for decades.
During April 1982, Russell Burrows claimed he was walking in the countryside near Olney when he discovered a cave that he proceeded to explore.
Inside the cave, Burrows claimed he found perhaps thousands of carved stones bearing figures of deities, humans and ships, as well as letters or text of an unknown origin.
Burrows Cave involves two highly polarized camps.



'Lucky' Dog Uncovers Rebel Cache

By Ellsworth Boyd
From page 36 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Twelve-year-old Tommy Baldwin wanted to call his dog “Lucky,” but his father, Maurice, had another name in mind.
So they agreed to flip a coin and Maurice won.
He named the puppy “Chester,” a fitting nomenclature for what grew into a 125-lb. Chesapeake Bay retriever with huge paws and a yen to dig.
Indigenous to the Middle-Atlantic states, Maryland in particular, “Chesapeakes” are popular water dogs. Many a duck hunter has praised his retriever when it stubbornly stayed its course and refused to return without the feathery quarry in its mouth.
Most Chesapeakes would prefer to drown in retrieval mode rather than disappoint their masters.



State Treasures - Tennessee

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 39 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Wenten Farm Treasure
COFFEE COUNTY - Cefe Wenten owned a prosperous farm near Hillsboro around the time of the Civil War.
Wenten was outspoken about his distrust of banks and it was common knowledge to the locals that the man buried his money in nail kegs somewhere on the farm.
This had been Wenten’s manner for years.
The bloody Brixie gang moved into the area in 1864 and they were known to plunder those who crossed their path.
The Brixie boys heard through the grapevine that Wenten was a wealthy farmer who secreted his money in the ground on his farm.
One evening the Brixie boys forced entry into the Wenten home and grabbed the farmer from his bed.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 42 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


(There is a) possible gold or silver bullion ship in Lake Michigan. Any further information on it?

Thanks,
Jon MacVean, Via e-mail



Tools of the Trade - Stay Local and Find More!

By Andy Sabisch
From page 46 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As spring weather approaches, treasure hunters are ready to get out and start making those finds that have been but dreams all winter.
Equipment has been readied, research conducted, and trips planned for the first opportunity where Mother Nature cooperates.
Wait a minute…what’s with the “trips planned” part of that last sentence?
Let’s stop there and launch into this month’s column with that thought.
Thanks to the power of the Internet and the myriad of forums that exist today, many treasure hunters have spent their winter time inside browsing through posts showing incredible finds made by others across the country.



State Treasures - Idaho

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 50 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lost Hoodoo Gold Mine
BOISE COUNTY - If I lived near Idaho City I would be searching for this site since it has a well defined search parameter and the gold taken from here originally proved to be of a high concentrate.
According to legend, the discoverer of the Hoodoo Mine was an employee working for the U.S. Forest Service who, by chance, stumbled upon a rich vein along Hoodoo Creek.
He was on foot and returning to Idaho City when he made the find.
He broke off some of the rock in the vein and marked the location by sinking his hand axe firmly in a fir tree.
Locals in Idaho City who looked at the specimens the forester returned with warned him against having the specimens assayed.



The Historic California Gold Rush Sites in Coloma and Placerville - Part II

By Roy Stevenson
From page 56 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In my previous article, “The California Gold Rush of ’49 and How Sacramento Fed the Gold Fever,” I described the discovery of gold in California in 1848 and how the gold rush changed the state.
I also showed how Sacramento boomed with gold prospectors passing through its gates to the Eldorado gold sites and where you can still find original gold rush buildings and exhibits in that town.
This second article describes life in the gold fields and two of the main ’49 gold sites, Coloma and Placerville…
Some struck enormous wealth in gold in the El Dorado streams and rivers. In 1849, 90,000 people found $50 million worth of gold. The next year $75 million was unearthed.



Sunken Galleons and Stalwart Men

By John Christopher Fine
From page 60 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It began by accident. Ocean lifeguards would get to the beach at 7 a.m., spending a couple of hours of physical training, rowing the rescue boat, swimming, running barefoot in the sand, and then getting the station set up for the day’s beach goers.
A routine broken only by Florida’s sometimes unpredictable tropical storms.
The day started like all of the others for Peter Leo. He was Lieutenant of Jupiter Beach.
Jupiter is an upscale community on the northern border of Palm Beach County’s Atlantic coast.
Peter had been lifeguarding the beach for many years, participating in surf rescues and boat rescues, incidents in the Jupiter Inlet that bordered the beach with a stone jetty to the north.



Beach Combing on the Great Lakes

By Patricia Kerr
From page 64 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Paula Matheson of the Plummer Additional Township in northern Ontario is a newbie to the world of lost treasure hunting, but her first year has proved successful because she is experienced with the water level fluctuations on the Great Lakes.
“I’m so happy!” she laughs. “Where’s my shovel?” and she’s heading back out searching the sand around their home on the north shore of Lake Huron.
Matheson points out the various landmarks around her home. The area east of her home is completely dry and covered in tall weeds.
“That’s where my kids swam when they were little. It was only about 3 feet deep at that time. So it was safer for them to paddle around.”



Money Talk - Those Special Barber Half Dollars

By Frank Colletti
From page 53 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In a previous column we discussed the set of Barber half dollars. As you may remember, this design, issued from 1892 to 1915, was designed by Charles Barber.
Even in his day, Barber was not considered to be an especially talented designer.
As a result, not many collectors of the day desired to amass a nice high grade set of Barber (also called Liberty Head) half dollars.
However, this is today and, over the course of the past 10 to 15 years, these Barber half dollars have become more appreciated every year.
There are many high priced Barber half dollars, especially the mint marked pieces in the early years of 1892 and 1893 plus 1896 and 1897.
However, they all have mintages ranging from a low of 390,000 to a high of well over one million pieces produced.



Finding Long Lost Sites

By Michael Haer
From page 6 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Detecting farm fields is my favorite form of hunting; the only downfall is half the year or longer they are planted, but if I could I would be metal detecting fields all year long.
Most of my best finds have come from field sites and the best part of it is, with a little bit of research, there are an unlimited amount of places to hunt.
When I first started overlaying maps here in Ohio, I was amazed at how many houses, barns, taverns, mills and even towns that are no longer standing, some being gone for a hundred plus years! 



The Ghost Town of Glenville

By Andrew Hind
From page 8 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the earliest years of the 19th century, the vast forests of Ontario, Canada’s, York Region lured industrious men into the wilderness in search of their fortunes.
These men scoured the area for suitable sawmill sites and, once they located one, began vigorously cutting down trees.
Timber was gold at the time, and in particular pine, which was used as masts for the Royal Navy.
The forgotten hamlet of Glenville was one of many communities in Ontario that owed its original existence to a sawmill.
It lived and died largely with the lumber industry, and today is a ghost town tantalizingly close to Toronto and yet completely free of the development that has swept the region over the past two centuries.



Prospecting for Gold in the Northeastern United States

By Andy Sabisch
From page 15 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Gold has played an integral role in the development and expansion of the United States since the 1700’s.
The first U.S. gold rush started when 12-year-old Conrad Reed was fishing in the creek on his family’s farm near present-day Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1799 and found a 17-pound gold nugget.
Mining activities dominated the surrounding area for decades and millions of dollars worth of gold was recovered.
As a matter of fact, the U.S. Government opened a little-known mint in Charlotte in 1837 to process the gold being mined locally and produced gold coins bearing the “C” mintmark.
It remained in operation until the Civil War broke out and, over its short lifetime, produced more than $5,000,000 in gold coins! 



A White's & Precision Dredge Adventure

By Gerry Edwards
From page 20 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On November 16, 2011, I got a call from my dear friend who owns Savana Engineering and Precision Dredge companies. He wanted to know if I would go
to Africa as his Operations Manager. I did not even hesitate with my answer and responded, “When am I leaving?”
I would specifically be going to Sierra Leone to mine for diamonds and gold. 
I was to teach other companies the feasibility of recovering the fine gold from the Baffi River. It’s all history now, as my first trip lasted three months.
Soon February 2012 rolled around and I had the necessary immunizations and visas for Sierra Leone, along with a good supply of malaria pills.



Beach Combing on the Great Lakes

By Patricia Kerr
From page 64 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Paula Matheson of the Plummer Additional Township in northern Ontario is a newbie to the world of lost treasure hunting, but her first year has proved successful because she is experienced with the water level fluctuations on the Great Lakes.
“I’m so happy!” she laughs. “Where’s my shovel?” and she’s heading back out searching the sand around their home on the north shore of Lake Huron.
Matheson points out the various landmarks around her home. The area east of her home is completely dry and covered in tall weeds.
“That’s where my kids swam when they were little. It was only about 3 feet deep at that time. So it was safer for them to paddle around.”



Civic Patrol

By Celine Buffett
From page 23 of the March, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Deputy’s Ring Found
and Returned by Detectorists
LEBANON – A ceremony was held recently to honor Bill Baecker and two others for their roles in finding the wedding ring that belonged to a Warren County sheriff’s sergeant who was killed in the line of duty the week before.
Baecker, using a metal detector, walked the lonely, rainy corner of U.S. 42 and Utica Road in Lebanon and discovered the ring of Sgt. Brian Dulle who was killed in a high-speed chase.
Baecker had it returned to Abbie Dulle on the day of her husband’s funeral.
Sheriff Lary Sims honored Baecker, who was aided by members of Warren County Judge Joseph Kirby’s family.



State Treasures - Hawaii

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the March, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure In The Sand
(HAWAII) Most any beach in Hawaii where people gather is a good place to hunt.
The best times of course are just after a big storm has moved through the area, or shortly after an event has taken place.
The Hawaiian Islands draws a lot of people to her shores every year. It is a location that visitors can travel to year round for recreation.
Another benefit of hunting Hawaii’s beaches in your advantage is that visitors will bring their finer pieces of jewelry with them.
Not to leave them behind in their room, but to wear so they can be seen.
Once the tourist hits the beach sporting their nice pieces of jewelry the suntan lotion usually comes out next.