How To: The Real Scoop on Digging Targets

By Tom Vance
From page 14 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Because I’ve been metal detecting since 1965, I’ve seen a lot of changes in our hobby.
Having owned and hunted with a large variety of well-known brands of detectors I have found myself with a changing attitude through the years.
Not only have I used a variety of detectors, but I’ve also gone through a wide variety of diggers and methods of target recovery.
Now, just like all good coin and cache hunters, I began my target recovery using the plain, old, fixed blade sheath knife.
The first one I started with was an inexpensive (less than $10) weapon that attached to my belt and could be carried there without fear of losing it.



How To: The Real Scoop on Digging Targets

By Tom Vance
From page 14 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Because I’ve been metal detecting since 1965, I’ve seen a lot of changes in our hobby.
Having owned and hunted with a large variety of well-known brands of detectors I have found myself with a changing attitude through the years.
Not only have I used a variety of detectors, but I’ve also gone through a wide variety of diggers and methods of target recovery.
Now, just like all good coin and cache hunters, I began my target recovery using the plain, old, fixed blade sheath knife.
The first one I started with was an inexpensive (less than $10) weapon that attached to my belt and could be carried there without fear of losing it.



Dying For Gold at Holt

By Vicki Huntington Hooper
From page 16 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On Meadow Valley Creek in the northwest corner of Washington County you will find Holt, Utah. Once a small pioneer settlement with hopes and dreams of building a permanent farming community, it now has very few remains that a town even existed.
Holt was established  in 1874 by James Holt, his family and small group of Mormon pioneers.
The town didn’t seem to be part of Mother Nature’s plan for the Escalante Desert Country. She dealt Holt devastation from drought to flooding it with red silt-laden water that washed away homes and farmlands and everything in between.



An Unlikely Treasure Found

By William Walker
From page 18 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasures come in different forms, sizes, and shapes, and they don’t necessarily have to be gold coins.
Here is an interesting story of a very unusual discovery with a most fascinating history. 
As a teen in Knoxville, Tennessee, my family had the good fortune of having a dense wooded area behind the house for the kids to play and, like most young boys, I spent a lot of time in the woods building forts and playing soldiers with the other kids. This was in the mid 50’s.
While walking through the woods one day, I tripped on an object buried in the leaves. It moved slightly so I knew it couldn’t be a root. I reached down through the leaves and lifted the heavy article from the ground and, to my astonishment, I had stumbled upon a rifle.



Shipwreck Artifacts to Enhance

By John Christopher Fine
From page 20 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Major improvements have been made to Dubois Park at Jupiter Beach, Florida. Contractors enhanced existing facilities and County Park and Recreation officials added attractions that bring cultural heritage to life to give visitors and residents a sense of history about the area.
“With care and maintenance these artifacts will remain time capsules. They will spark the imagination of young and old for generations to come,” Peter Leo said.
Peter is a 32-year veteran career Ocean Lifeguard for Palm Beach County. It was his day to day duties on Jupiter Beach that eventually led to his discovery of a Spanish courier ship lost just offshore in shallow water.
Now 57, Peter made his first underwater find south of the Jupiter Inlet jetty almost 20 years ago.



Metal Detecting Saved A Life

By Michael Haer
From page 23 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the fall of 2011, I received a call from a gentleman needing help with his recent purchase of a Minelab Explorer from one of my competitors.
I am not going to lie; it is aggravating when someone purchases their metal detector from a competitor and then asks me for help, but after several phone conversation
I really started to like him and could tell he had expected the dealer he purchased his detector from locally to help him and, unfortunately, he wasn’t getting the help he needed.
After a few more times talking to Tim, we set up a time to meet so I could help him.
As a young kid Tim got into metal detecting when, at 10-years-old, and only having his detector for a few months, a local woman contacted him. She had lost her very valuable wedding ring.



State Treasures - South Carolina

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Kids Will Be Kids
YORK COUNTY - Kids will be kids and in this case it cost one farmer from Smyrna his family’s life savings.
Around 1900 there was a report that a farmer living about three miles out of Smyrna in northwest York County used some type of empty ordnance described as either a hollowed out cannon ball or an empty shell casing to hide his family’s fortune.
The make shift bank was kept in his bedroom closet in plain view; his reasoning was that thieves wouldn’t trouble themselves with an old war souvenir that appeared live and might blow up in their faces.
But what a thief may’ve bypassed as too much trouble made an irresistible toy to children.



The Second Find of a Lifetime

By Greg King
From page 32 of the May, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


While eating out with my family recently, I received a call from a friend, Gary Anderson, who I sometimes detect with.
He was calling to let me know of a site he had been digging silver coins from. I had already planned to deer hunt with my son and grandson the following morning, however, Mother Nature placed a damper on those plans, as we woke up to a mild steady rain!
The rain began to move out later in the morning so I decided I would go down and check on the site my friend told me about.
I called Gary and he was working until 12, so I asked him what specific area at the site he was finding the silver coins. I had started searching the area, as I like to dig relics as much as I like digging silver and older coins.



Tools of the Trade - Stay Local and Find More!

By Andy Sabisch
From page 46 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As spring weather approaches, treasure hunters are ready to get out and start making those finds that have been but dreams all winter.
Equipment has been readied, research conducted, and trips planned for the first opportunity where Mother Nature cooperates.
Wait a minute…what’s with the “trips planned” part of that last sentence?
Let’s stop there and launch into this month’s column with that thought.
Thanks to the power of the Internet and the myriad of forums that exist today, many treasure hunters have spent their winter time inside browsing through posts showing incredible finds made by others across the country.



State Treasures - Idaho

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 50 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lost Hoodoo Gold Mine
BOISE COUNTY - If I lived near Idaho City I would be searching for this site since it has a well defined search parameter and the gold taken from here originally proved to be of a high concentrate.
According to legend, the discoverer of the Hoodoo Mine was an employee working for the U.S. Forest Service who, by chance, stumbled upon a rich vein along Hoodoo Creek.
He was on foot and returning to Idaho City when he made the find.
He broke off some of the rock in the vein and marked the location by sinking his hand axe firmly in a fir tree.
Locals in Idaho City who looked at the specimens the forester returned with warned him against having the specimens assayed.



Money Talk - Those Special Barber Half Dollars

By Frank Colletti
From page 53 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In a previous column we discussed the set of Barber half dollars. As you may remember, this design, issued from 1892 to 1915, was designed by Charles Barber.
Even in his day, Barber was not considered to be an especially talented designer.
As a result, not many collectors of the day desired to amass a nice high grade set of Barber (also called Liberty Head) half dollars.
However, this is today and, over the course of the past 10 to 15 years, these Barber half dollars have become more appreciated every year.
There are many high priced Barber half dollars, especially the mint marked pieces in the early years of 1892 and 1893 plus 1896 and 1897.
However, they all have mintages ranging from a low of 390,000 to a high of well over one million pieces produced.



The Historic California Gold Rush Sites in Coloma and Placerville - Part II

By Roy Stevenson
From page 56 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In my previous article, “The California Gold Rush of ’49 and How Sacramento Fed the Gold Fever,” I described the discovery of gold in California in 1848 and how the gold rush changed the state.
I also showed how Sacramento boomed with gold prospectors passing through its gates to the Eldorado gold sites and where you can still find original gold rush buildings and exhibits in that town.
This second article describes life in the gold fields and two of the main ’49 gold sites, Coloma and Placerville…
Some struck enormous wealth in gold in the El Dorado streams and rivers. In 1849, 90,000 people found $50 million worth of gold. The next year $75 million was unearthed.



Sunken Galleons and Stalwart Men

By John Christopher Fine
From page 60 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It began by accident. Ocean lifeguards would get to the beach at 7 a.m., spending a couple of hours of physical training, rowing the rescue boat, swimming, running barefoot in the sand, and then getting the station set up for the day’s beach goers.
A routine broken only by Florida’s sometimes unpredictable tropical storms.
The day started like all of the others for Peter Leo. He was Lieutenant of Jupiter Beach.
Jupiter is an upscale community on the northern border of Palm Beach County’s Atlantic coast.
Peter had been lifeguarding the beach for many years, participating in surf rescues and boat rescues, incidents in the Jupiter Inlet that bordered the beach with a stone jetty to the north.



Beach Combing on the Great Lakes

By Patricia Kerr
From page 64 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Paula Matheson of the Plummer Additional Township in northern Ontario is a newbie to the world of lost treasure hunting, but her first year has proved successful because she is experienced with the water level fluctuations on the Great Lakes.
“I’m so happy!” she laughs. “Where’s my shovel?” and she’s heading back out searching the sand around their home on the north shore of Lake Huron.
Matheson points out the various landmarks around her home. The area east of her home is completely dry and covered in tall weeds.
“That’s where my kids swam when they were little. It was only about 3 feet deep at that time. So it was safer for them to paddle around.”



Beach Combing on the Great Lakes

By Patricia Kerr
From page 64 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Paula Matheson of the Plummer Additional Township in northern Ontario is a newbie to the world of lost treasure hunting, but her first year has proved successful because she is experienced with the water level fluctuations on the Great Lakes.
“I’m so happy!” she laughs. “Where’s my shovel?” and she’s heading back out searching the sand around their home on the north shore of Lake Huron.
Matheson points out the various landmarks around her home. The area east of her home is completely dry and covered in tall weeds.
“That’s where my kids swam when they were little. It was only about 3 feet deep at that time. So it was safer for them to paddle around.”



Finding Long Lost Sites

By Michael Haer
From page 6 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Detecting farm fields is my favorite form of hunting; the only downfall is half the year or longer they are planted, but if I could I would be metal detecting fields all year long.
Most of my best finds have come from field sites and the best part of it is, with a little bit of research, there are an unlimited amount of places to hunt.
When I first started overlaying maps here in Ohio, I was amazed at how many houses, barns, taverns, mills and even towns that are no longer standing, some being gone for a hundred plus years! 



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 42 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


(There is a) possible gold or silver bullion ship in Lake Michigan. Any further information on it?
Thanks,
Jon MacVean, Via e-mail



The Ghost Town of Glenville

By Andrew Hind
From page 8 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the earliest years of the 19th century, the vast forests of Ontario, Canada’s, York Region lured industrious men into the wilderness in search of their fortunes.
These men scoured the area for suitable sawmill sites and, once they located one, began vigorously cutting down trees.
Timber was gold at the time, and in particular pine, which was used as masts for the Royal Navy.
The forgotten hamlet of Glenville was one of many communities in Ontario that owed its original existence to a sawmill.
It lived and died largely with the lumber industry, and today is a ghost town tantalizingly close to Toronto and yet completely free of the development that has swept the region over the past two centuries.



Prospecting for Gold in the Northeastern United States

By Andy Sabisch
From page 15 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Gold has played an integral role in the development and expansion of the United States since the 1700’s.
The first U.S. gold rush started when 12-year-old Conrad Reed was fishing in the creek on his family’s farm near present-day Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1799 and found a 17-pound gold nugget.
Mining activities dominated the surrounding area for decades and millions of dollars worth of gold was recovered.
As a matter of fact, the U.S. Government opened a little-known mint in Charlotte in 1837 to process the gold being mined locally and produced gold coins bearing the “C” mintmark.
It remained in operation until the Civil War broke out and, over its short lifetime, produced more than $5,000,000 in gold coins! 



A White's & Precision Dredge Adventure

By Gerry Edwards
From page 20 of the April, 2013 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2013 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On November 16, 2011, I got a call from my dear friend who owns Savana Engineering and Precision Dredge companies. He wanted to know if I would go
to Africa as his Operations Manager. I did not even hesitate with my answer and responded, “When am I leaving?”
I would specifically be going to Sierra Leone to mine for diamonds and gold. 
I was to teach other companies the feasibility of recovering the fine gold from the Baffi River. It’s all history now, as my first trip lasted three months.
Soon February 2012 rolled around and I had the necessary immunizations and visas for Sierra Leone, along with a good supply of malaria pills.