Successful Coinshooting in Eerie Places

By Lee Courtney
From page 21 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I’m not sure of what exactly makes a ghost town a ghost.No one really believes that an uninhabited cluster of old structures is normally populated by misty, wraithlike forms bent on doing them harm, or at least not above playing a few mischievous pranks now and then for the fun of it.Yet, everyone knows what such an abandoned community looks like, particularly one west of the Rockies.The whole scene appears out of focus and lightly fogged.There’s a dusty unpaved street, general store, saloon with swinging doors, saddler, barber, jail, sporting house over the feed lot, undertaker, and a wooden church off to the side.For some strange reason, the private homes are invisible, although there may be farms and ranches a distance away.But, in any event, there are an unlimited number



Madeline Discovers Treasure

By Pat Hughes
From page 24 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


There is no age limit for people who can and do discover lost treasures and artifacts.On July 9, 2010, my seven-year-old niece, Madeline, and I were taking an adventure hike on Edgewater Road in Bowerbank, Maine, on Sebec Lake.Our family has owned a camp on this side of Sebec Lake for many years.This is the narrow part of the lake; if you look to the right at the water’s edge you will see the "big lake," and if you look to left you can see the entrance into the Sebec River.This past year, it was decided by the camp residents living there that the camp road needed some work.The road is currently being widened, the potholes are being filled, and deep ditches have been dug on the sides to help with rain damage and drainage.Each year during our hike, Madeline and I look on t



State Treasures - Montana

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 28 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Prospector’s Lost MineFLATHEAD COUNTY – It was a bitterly cold afternoon in 1898 when two brothers stumbled into an abandoned mining camp while hunting near the Peak of Columbia Mountain, elevation 7,169’. Lost to history are their names, but their story, and what they witnessed, remains well preserved in local legend.The camp consisted of a half-collapsed cabin with a dirt floor and rock fireplace. Outside, a lean-to containing a hand-built forge, an anvil, pieces of rusted drill steel, and hand tools with their wood handles rotted away were found near piles of bull quartz studded with wire gold.Near the front of the cabin two skeletons, one of a man, the other of a grizzly bear, were discovered.



'Pain Free' Treasure Hunting

By Andrew Hind
From page 30 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For the elderly, those who suffer from arthritis, or simply zealots who "over-do it," treasure hunting can lead to pain and discomfort.For the most part, treasure hunting and metal detecting is a hobby, so anything that takes away from the joyfulness of the experience can potentially turn individuals away from the pursuit.



An Uncommon Opportunity for Civil War Relic Hunters

By Jay Pastor
From page 32 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure hunters have a unique opportunity to search dozens of Civil War battle sites without interference. Many communities think that living people are more important than undeveloped real estate.And they haven’t the money or interest to fool around with the objections of "Save our history!" groups who feel that anywhere a rifle may have been fired in 1863 should be preserved as a national monument.These growing communities have slated areas to be cleared and paved for highways, building construction, public health, and appearance.And, outside approval or not, much of this demolition is going to happen. It’s to a treasure hunter’s advantage to get to these places before the bulldozers do.There’s certainly no harm in this.



Relics - What's Hot and What's Not

By John Christopher Fine
From page 36 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


My childhood hobby was collecting antique guns. Sometimes swords or odds and ends from western Americana, but mostly I sought out flintlock muskets and relics from America’s Civil War.On family excursions we’d stop along the road and inquire in antique shops to see what they had.Sometimes an old powder horn, sometimes a rusted and broken old musket. Never paid much for them - $5 or $10 was about my limit.My Dad was a wonderful worker in wood. Busted stocks that had years of paint or grime would be restored to their original fine walnut or burly maple.I had a collection of parts salvaged from old guns that were destined for the trash heap.With my Dad’s help, I got good at gunsmithing.



State Treasures - Missouri

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 39 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


$5 Million Whiskey TreasurePLATTE COUNTY – In a smoky saloon in Holt, Missouri, an "old river dog" sat drinking his beer while reminiscing about the dangerous snags that infested the Missouri River, and all the ships that’d run afoul or sank after colliding with one. As he spoke about the sinking of the riverboat, Francis X. Aubrey, a small group gathered around.It was 1896, and listening to old tales of the Missouri was a favorite local pastime. Listening to the old timer were Holt Mayor and Gale Henson, along with other prominent citizens.



Tools of the Trade - Technique, Technique, Technique

By Andy Sabisch
From page 41 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


OK, I’m sure the title of this month’s column has more than a few of you wondering what direction we will be heading over the next few pages, but I can guarantee that you will find more if you incorporate some of the tips provided.Over the past several months, I have been hearing a common theme from fellow treasure hunters, which is that a newer, upgraded detector is what is needed to boost their finds.While there’s no denying that today’s top-of-the-line metal detectors can find valuables that have been missed by previous hunters using older equipment, upgrading without making some changes to search techniques will often produce disappointing results, and have one spending money that could have used for accessories or simply kept in the bank.The bulk of this col



Metal Detector Field Test & Review - The Garrett AT Pro

By Chris Gholson
From page 56 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Anyone that has been involved with metal detecting for any length of time will have undoubtedly heard the name Garrett.Garrett has done wonderful things for the industry in four decades by supplying quality detectors and through their efforts to help promote the hobby. Their products have been responsible for finding millions of dollars worth of ancient coins, relics, jewelry and gold nuggets, and are revered by treasure seekers.In addition to the hand-held products, Garrett produces a range of detectors for use in security screening, crime scene investigation and for military de-mining operations.



A Remarkable History & Tantalizing Possibilities

By Andrew Hind
From page 8 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


No single event influenced the course of Colorado’s history more than the 1858 discovery of gold in what is now Denver. Camps and settlements sprung up overnight, and continued to spring up for more than half a century as new veins of gold were discovered in the state’s mountains.One of these boomtown settlements was Alta, a ghost town with a remarkable history and where tantalizing possibilities for uncovering gold still exists.For millennia, gold dust had washed out of the rugged mountains and accumulated at the mouths of streambeds. In May 1858, William Russell, a prospector from Georgia, discovered a rich deposit of this dust in Cherry Creek in present-day Denver. The rush was on.Throngs of gold seekers - estimated at 50,000 people - came to Colorado in 1858-59 alone.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 59 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Hi,...This is a knife I found metal detecting between Fort Pierce and Vero Beach, Florida, in April 2010.I was detecting an old mangrove that was reclaimed by a dozer for new construction.The knife was found about 100’ from the water and buried almost a foot deep. After getting it opened a little, I noticed the blade was thinner than most and sharp as a razor.



How To Find Buried Confederate Gold

By Albert Atwell
From page 11 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From a mass of traditional lore pertaining to quantities of gold, ranging from $1 to $6 million rumored to have been removed from the Confederate Treasury in Richmond and buried in North Carolina in the spring of 1865, one story that appears to bear the evidence of authenticity may now be accepted without reservation or skepticism.Vouching for the story are two Greensboro citizens who enjoy the confidence of the town in which they were born and in which they have lived more than three quarters of a century.They are Mrs. Matilda Hill Alford, who is 79 years of age, and her brother, Charles Eugene Eckel, who is 77.The gold was buried at "Rosa Villa," the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs.



Exploring Historic Hostels

By Launa D. Simmons
From page 62 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The dictionary defines a hostel as “supervised lodging for travelers.” It’s been many years since hostels were popular in this country. Nowadays, we prefer to call them “bed and breakfasts” or simply “inns.”
In the days of old, the weary traveler would often take lodging and food at hostels scattered throughout this country.
Many people were happy to open their homes to travelers, as it provided much-needed income, especially during the Great Depression.
Turning a home into a hostel was also a popular way for a widowed or otherwise single mother to provide for her children. It was a way for her to put food on the table and stay at home with her children.



Brother XII Cult Treasure Still Missing

By T.J. Davidson
From page 16 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


"I am the Messenger of Fire, the Messenger of the Whirlwind, the Messenger of the Day of Adjustment. By the Wind ye shall mount to the Heavens - if ye be the children of discernment. But as for the stubborn and the deaf and the blind, the Wind of Destruction shall carry them away." - Brother XII, from his book, The Three Truths.Seventy-five years have passed since the death of cult leader Edward Arthur Wilson. Today, few know his name, but, more than his name, many Canadians know of the legend of his lost treasure, a reported $400,000 in gold that many believe remains buried in the vicinity of his island fortress on De Courcy Island.So how did this broke Englishman rise to power to become such a wealthy man?



Garrett AT Pro Field Test

By Chris Gholson
From page 56 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Anyone that has been involved with metal detecting for any length of time will have undoubtedly heard the name Garrett. Founded by Charles Garrett and his wife, Eleanor, the Texasbased company has been supplying metal detection equipment since 1964.Garrett has done wonderful things for the industry in the past four decades by not only supplying quality detectors, but also through their ongoing efforts to help promote the hobby itself.



State Treasures - New Jersey

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 18 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Ancient Treasure
Found at Mantoloking
OCEAN COUNTY – On October 9, 1949, the New York Times ran a story about ancient treasure being found along the beach near Mantoloking. The treasure recovered included “eighteenth century coins plus some ancient articles of jewelry.”
Recoveries occurred on the sands along the beach and, while the origin of the treasure was unknown, it is assumed that an ancient shipwreck was the source.
Since annual storms are known to resupply the beach every year with flotsam from the ocean floor, this would be a good place to work with a detector after large storms.



The Saddle Tramp

By Connie Vigil Platt
From page 20 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This is a story that was told to the author by her uncle.
Colorado has a long tradition of cowboys, outlaws and ranching.
The area I will tell about was far enough away from civilization to be considered remote and desolate.
There were plenty of places where a bandit could hide; the canyons kept their secrets.
The entire country was hit hard during the depression of the 1930’s. Southern Colorado and the ranching industry particularly felt the strain.
I felt I was extremely lucky to have a job doing what I knew best, and that was being a cowboy.



How To Find Yellow Marble

By Pat Hughes
From page 23 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


What do Florida in the U.S. and Mount Everest, the highest (and still growing) spot in the world, share? They both started their existence on the ancient supercontinent Gondwana, over 445 million years ago. It is also interesting to note that on the top of Everest is a rock that was considered more valuable and more rare than gold by the ancient people. The famous yellow band seen just below the summit on Mount Everest is yellow marble. And finding these rocks can be an exciting adventure!Marble is an ancient sedimentary rock in a highly metamorphosed form. What that means is that ancient limestone and dolomites were squeezed so tightly that the heat and pressure altered the gray rock into the highly prized stone, marble. Marble is not a mineral, but a stone.



In Quest of Treasure

By John C. Fine
From page 27 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Ocean Lady rolled easily with light swells created by passing traffic in the Miami River as it was being fitted out at the Jones Boatyard.
The former University of Delaware research vessel had crisp lines and new yellow and green paint.
The crew was making final preparations to leave after months of planning and installation of customized treasure detecting equipment.
The vessel was loaded with electronics and search gear.
It would leave on a journey of discovery and adventure; the next port of call? Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic.
"Our first objective is to find a mystery ship on the Navidad Bank. There was testimony in 1688 that a galleon was seen there.



The Mt. Horeb Mine

By Art Redman
From page 32 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Twelve-year-old David Smith immigrated to Oregon from Missouri with his parents in 1852. He later obtained a map showing the purported location of a gold ledge on an unnamed butte lying a few miles south of the Little North Santiam River near Elkhorn.