Lost Gold Coins on the Santa Fe Trail

By Ken Weinman
From page 8 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Santa Fe Trail was a trader’s path. Never an actual road, it was a broad route following rivers and wagon ruts passing known landmarks from the Missouri River to Santa Fe, New Mexico.For some time American traders had been eying the riches of Santa Fe. The people of that lonely Mexican mission town wanted to trade with Americans, because Missouri was nearer than Mexico City.



Lost Golden Loot of the Tippie Gang

By Resti Concoles
From page 54 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


During the early 1860’s, outlaws known as the Tippie Gang were operating out of the frontier town of Fort Scott, Kansas. They specialized in rustling cattle and in armed robberies. Their crime spree came to an abrupt end one cold, rainy day in April 1866, when they were caught and hanged at Monmouth, Kansas.Even in the face of death, the bandits had a sense of humor. Before they were strung up, one of the posse took out a notebook and asked the condemned men their names.One outlaw asked, "What do you want our names for?" The posse member answered, "So we can tell your ma." The bandit then said with a smile, "Our ma knows our names." So they slapped the backs of the horses, and the men were launched into eternity.



Golconda: Lost Mine - Dead City

By Ron Ebner
From page 11 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Somewhere on the stark Arizona Desert of Mohave County lays the remnants of the 19th-century town of Golconda.I’d come across mention of it in Mr. Terry’s "United States Treasure Atlas" for Arizona and set myself the task of finding the place.It was obvious to me that, if its location was not generally known - and it seemed it wasn’t - then metal detecting opportunities there could be quite good.I learned that the Golconda (named after Golkonda, a 16th-century town and fort in India) mines were first developed in the Cerbat Mts.



Metal Detector Field Test & Review - Teknetics G-2

By Andy Sabisch
From page 58 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This issue’s field test covers the latest addition to the growing line of state-of-the-art detectors being developed by First Texas under the guidance of Dave Johnson and his team of engineers.At the time the Teknetics moniker was first resurrected by First Texas a few years ago, to support the introduction of their professional series of detectors, there was but one model in the line – the T2.Much the way the original line of Teknetics detectors did in the 1970’s and 1980’s, the T2 quickly gained the reputation of offering high-end performance, ease of operation and lighter weight than that found on other top-of-the-line detectors.Dave and his team continued their development efforts and, over the last few years, have added other detectors to the Teknetics line



State Treasures - New Hampshire

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 15 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lost Algonquin Treasure CaveROCKINGHAM COUNTY – When the war between France and England spread across the Atlantic to North America it was the British Colonies that were targeted. French military-attachés in Canada were sent south to operate among the Native American tribes near British settlements. Already resentful over the loss of their ancestral lands, the French easily marshaled the rage the Indians felt.France supplied their allies, the Algonquin Indians, with firearms, ammunition, and training. Once accomplished, the French military advisors returned to Canada.



Money Talk - The Guide Book Professional Edition

By Frank Colletti
From page 60 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As many of you know, I am a collector of the Whitman publications "The Guide Book of United States Coins," [more commonly known as the "Red Book"] and the "Handbook of United States Coins," [usually called the "Blue Book"].The Guide Book has been published since 1947 and the Handbook since 1942.The major difference is that the Guide Book is a retail price guide and the Handbook is a wholesale price guide.The Guide Book (especially) contains tons of information and data that could take you years to accumulate, if you could even find the data anywhere else.Each coin design is described, including metal content, designer, and relevant historical data.If you wanted to do a study of which coins have moved in price over the years, there is no better way



Invisible Gold

By Anne Cyr
From page 18 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The chance of finding gold lying along an old streambed is remote, especially here in the United States.So, how can it be true that Nevada is the fourth largest gold producing area in the world?The answer is simple. That is where all the invisible gold is located.Invisible gold? That sounds a lot like an alchemy term.Alchemists, the term Alchemy, comes from Ancient Greek word khemia, meaning "the art of transmuting metals," used to report that they could find elements like astral gold, elementary gold and vulgar gold.It was also believed that there was an element called vegetable gold.Astral gold was actually created by the sun.



Teknetics G2

By Andy Sabisch
From page 56 of the April, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


TEKNETICS G2 This issue’s field test covers the latest addition to the growing line of state-of-the-art detectors being developed by First Texas under the guidance of Dave Johnson and his team of engineers.At the time the Teknetics moniker was first resurrected by First Texas a few years ago, to support the introduction of their professional series of detectors, there was but one model in the line – the T2.  Much the way the original line of Teknetics detectors did in the 1970’s and 1980’s, the T2 quickly gained the reputation of offering high-end performance, ease of operation and lighter weight than that found on other top-of-the-line detectors.Dave and his team continued their development efforts and, over the last few years, have ad



The Mt. Horeb Mine

By Art Redman
From page 32 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Twelve-year-old David Smith immigrated to Oregon from Missouri with his parents in 1852. He later obtained a map showing the purported location of a gold ledge on an unnamed butte lying a few miles south of the Little North Santiam River near Elkhorn.



Winter - A Season of Healing and Growth

By Jay Pastor
From page 34 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


If you dread the winter (particularly as a new detectorist), you can turn this confining season into something positive by welcoming it as a sort of hospital stay rather than as a term in prison.
By devoting this otherwise idle time to correcting problems you’ve encountered while out in the field, you stand a good chance of emerging into the spring sunlight a much better treasure hunter than you were when the snows first started to fall.
Begin by making up a list of things that bother you on your treasure hunts.
You can do this the best way, as soon as they happen, or later on from memory.
Was there anything about your detector that didn’t work the way you would have liked it to perform?



Coin Shooting Inside and Outside the Box

By Chris Wilkinson
From page 39 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The scene is a lovely Sunday morning in late spring and, as usual, I woke up with coin shooting on my mind. After reviewing my detecting notebook over morning coffee, I decided to hit a site I hadn’t been to since late last summer. An old school built in 1937 where I’d found a few Indian Head Cents, an 1819 Large Cent, several dozen Wheat Back Cents, but never a single silver coin.During the hour-long drive, I planned out my strategy for the day, trying to figure out how I might put an end to my silver coin drought. I remembered a small area I had hit pretty hard where I found a handful of "Wheats" the last time I hunted the schoolyard.



State Treasures - Mississippi

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 41 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Samuel Mason, Land
Pirate of the Natchez Trace
CLAIRBOURNE COUNTY – Much of the early history and old legends told of the Natchez Trace about battles, cached treasures, outlaws and the excessive violence they employed to get their dirty work accomplished has been passed from generation to generation.
One such outlaw was Samuel Mason and his gang, who robbed and murdered travelers, freighters, and westbound immigrants along the Trace for almost 13 years.
Samuel Mason, also spelled Meason, (1739-1803) was born in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1739 and raised in Charles Town, West Virginia. He served as captain of the militia in Ohio County, Virginia (present-day West Virginia), during the American Revolution.



Tools of the Trade - Detecting Around Drywash Patches

By Chris Gholson
From page 44 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I can clearly remember the first time I encountered a drywashing patch while out prospecting in the desert north of Phoenix, Arizona. At that point, I was still just a teenager and a true greenhorn.
I had learned the basics from my father, but I was a far cry from an expert when it came to sniffing out gold. Fortunately, I befriended an older gentleman that had spent a great many years searching for the yellow metal.
He had started metal detecting back in the 70’s and had plucked many ounces of nuggets from all over the western United States.
He took a liking to me and agreed that, if I would do the driving and carry our gear, he would teach me what he could about the art of electronic prospecting.



Civic Patrol - The Spring Break Adventure

By Celine Buffett
From page 47 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This issue's story comes from Don Frick and is told in his own words.
It was that time of year again, spring break on Florida beaches, a potentially rewarding time for a metal detectorist.
Spring break is a time when parents with elementary school children, high school boys and girls, and college kids come by the thousands to the beach to party, play, and soak up the sunrays of springtime.
They bring with them watches, class rings, earrings and other jewelry, often items just purchased for this occasion.
Teens come from all over the country, but most come from the southeastern states and often arrive in groups by the carload.
They begin showing up on the beaches about 10 a.m. daily and come and go throughout the day.



State Treasures - Minnesota

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 50 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


$100,000 Remains Missing
OLMSTED–FILMORE COUNTIES – January 17, 1934, was a bitter cold morning in St. Paul. Inside the Bremer mansion, the morning unfolded like any other, with hot coffee and breakfast.
As Edward G. Bremer, Jr., President of the St. Paul Commercial Bank and heir to the president of the Schmidt Brewing Company, prepared for another day at the bank, his nine-year-old daughter, Betty, was getting dressed for school.
As was their daily routine, after breakfast Bremer would drive his daughter to school. Right on time, the two pulled out of their driveway at 92 North Mississippi River Blvd. in Mr. Bremer’s black Lincoln, turned south onto Cretin Avenue South, then east onto West Summit Avenue.



The Lost Tungsten Deposits

By Joe Meis
From page 52 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


No other metal mimics gold better than tungsten. Not found in the earth in its pure state, it’s found only in a few, rare minerals. The best source of tungsten is the mineral Scheelite that is composed of calcium and tungsten.This ore mineral is named after Karl (sometimes shown as Carl) Wilhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist who found, in 1781, that the mineral contained an acid he named Tungsten. When heated with carbon, it produced metallic tungsten.Tungsten is also found in Wolframite, and with manganese and iron. Tungsten ore is mainly found in China. Other countries that produce it are the U.S., Brazil, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, Spain, and Southern Rhodesia.In the U.S., the main production states are California, Nevada, North Carolina, Idaho, Colorado, and Arizona.



Metal Detector Field Test & Review - The Garrett AT Pro

By Chris Gholson
From page 56 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Anyone that has been involved with metal detecting for any length of time will have undoubtedly heard the name Garrett.Garrett has done wonderful things for the industry in four decades by supplying quality detectors and through their efforts to help promote the hobby. Their products have been responsible for finding millions of dollars worth of ancient coins, relics, jewelry and gold nuggets, and are revered by treasure seekers.In addition to the hand-held products, Garrett produces a range of detectors for use in security screening, crime scene investigation and for military de-mining operations.



A Remarkable History & Tantalizing Possibilities

By Andrew Hind
From page 8 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


No single event influenced the course of Colorado’s history more than the 1858 discovery of gold in what is now Denver. Camps and settlements sprung up overnight, and continued to spring up for more than half a century as new veins of gold were discovered in the state’s mountains.One of these boomtown settlements was Alta, a ghost town with a remarkable history and where tantalizing possibilities for uncovering gold still exists.For millennia, gold dust had washed out of the rugged mountains and accumulated at the mouths of streambeds. In May 1858, William Russell, a prospector from Georgia, discovered a rich deposit of this dust in Cherry Creek in present-day Denver. The rush was on.Throngs of gold seekers - estimated at 50,000 people - came to Colorado in 1858-59 alone.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 59 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Hi,...This is a knife I found metal detecting between Fort Pierce and Vero Beach, Florida, in April 2010.I was detecting an old mangrove that was reclaimed by a dozer for new construction.The knife was found about 100’ from the water and buried almost a foot deep. After getting it opened a little, I noticed the blade was thinner than most and sharp as a razor.



How To Find Buried Confederate Gold

By Albert Atwell
From page 11 of the March, 2011 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2011 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From a mass of traditional lore pertaining to quantities of gold, ranging from $1 to $6 million rumored to have been removed from the Confederate Treasury in Richmond and buried in North Carolina in the spring of 1865, one story that appears to bear the evidence of authenticity may now be accepted without reservation or skepticism.Vouching for the story are two Greensboro citizens who enjoy the confidence of the town in which they were born and in which they have lived more than three quarters of a century.They are Mrs. Matilda Hill Alford, who is 79 years of age, and her brother, Charles Eugene Eckel, who is 77.The gold was buried at "Rosa Villa," the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs.