Lost Gold of the Cariboo

By H. James McDougall
From page 20 of the June, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


George McCauley was alone when he left the Cariboo Gold Mine in a buckboard carrying 60 pounds of gold, but he was not worried about a hold-up. He and his partners knew just about everybody in the district around Camp McKinney in August of 1896. Even if anyone should attempt a robbery, where could he go?

The land in south central British Columbia between the Okanagan Kettle Valleys was lonely and barren, and the trails which could be used as an escape route were few and far between. No one would try anything when he knew he couldn't escape, the miners reasoned, so George was sent to get the winter supplies and equipment without a guard.



Vigo Bay's $120,000,000 Treasure

By Richard Taylor
From page 22 of the June, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Vigo Bay! The words electrify every serious treasure hunter, for they name the site of the world's largest sunken treasure.

For more than 250 years, efforts have been made to salvage the vast hoard of gold, silver and jewels that lies within a three-mile body of water off the shore of northwestern Spain. At least $20,000,000 of the treasure has been recovered, but an addition-al $120,000,000 still lies under the water and mud.



Treasure In Maine

By D. Van Atchley
From page 25 of the June, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Balley's Island is one of several hundred islands in Casco Bay off the coast of Maine and, like many of these islands, includes among its legends tales of pirates and their buried booty.

It is known that pirates did bury much of their loot on islands all over the world, and it is believed that Bailey's Island harbors beneath its soil some of this loot.

One substantial fact is that part of this treasure already has been found, leading one to suspect that more caches may still be buried on the island.

A fisherman-farmer, John Wilson, was out duck hunting. After shooting a bird, he went to get it and, while doing so, fell into a crevasse between the rocks. In the crevasse, he uncovered an old, rusted iron pot filled with Spanish gold coins.



Hawaiis Lost Imperial Jade

By Jeff Ferguson
From page 26 of the June, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was a bleak autumn day in 1912 as Yuan Hsi stood patiently on the rear terrace of his palace watch-ing the drizzle sweep through the forest. He was a Chinese nobleman, a direct descendant of one of the many Imperial mandarins who had ruled parts of northern China in centuries past. He was a wealthy, educated man by virtue of his royal position.
His palace was an ancient struc-ture with a graceful, overhanging tile roof ending in upturned eaves. Once intended as a fortress, it was built on the edge of a plateau with but a single, defendable entrance facing the road and lower slopes to the east. The rear was thrust over a low cliff, supported by long wood-en stilts firmly braced with thick crossbeams.



Lost Pipe Clay Prospect

By Russ Hartill
From page 29 of the June, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the 1870's, Dutch Schippe I was a familiar figure to resi-dents of the Kings River country in Fresno County, California. Few gave Schippe, a luckless, but patient and persistent prospector, credit for having sufficient knowledge of mineralogy to make an important strike, but one day he proved them all wrong.

Coming into town, Schippe displayed an ore bag containing chunks of gold coated with a clinging, fine clay that onlookers insisted was good pipe clay.



Humpy's Lost Mine

By Gene Kivett
From page 30 of the June, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the summer of 1876, an unlucky little man everybody called Humpy lay dying in a hospital in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He was a hunchback and completely insane. On top of that, he had smallpox. It was the smallpox that was killing him.

Few people ever knew his real name. Before he lost his senses, Humpy worked as a swamper and handyman in cowtown saloons. He also did some gold prospecting. He found gold, lots of it, but his luck was so bad he never cashed in a single nugget.

As he lay dying in the hospital ward, a kindly nurse stood by, doing whatever she could to ease her patient's suffering. Suddenly, Humpy opened his eyes and glared wildly at the nurse. He gasped, then sputtered at the top of his feeble voice, "I've found it! I've found it!"



Steamboat Treasures of the Ohio River

By John K. Ward
From page 38 of the June, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Marquis de Lafayette made his last visit to the United States during the years 1824-25. After touring the East, he stopped in Nashville, Tennessee, where he was elaborately entertained. On May 6, 1825, he departed the Tennessee capitol and headed for Marietta, Ohio.

For this portion of his trip, the steamboat "Mechanic" was chartered. The party contained a number of dignitaries in addition to Lafayette. The Mechanic traveled down the Cumberland River and started up the Ohio without major incident. About midnight on May 8, as she was nearing the mouth of Deer Creek some 125 miles downstream from Louisville, the steamer suddenly snagged.



Treasure In Massachusetts

By Robert J. Burke
From page 36 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


There are more caves, caverns, crevices, man-made mines and hidden holes in a 20-mile belt extending north to south in western Massachusetts than in any similar area in New England. Legends about lost treasures and rich ore abound around Pittsfield, and most of them sprang from actual happenings.

Clues from history concerning this cave country should give the careful treasure hunter facts to work on. A few are given here. Others could be unearthed with research in the Berkshire Museum on South Street in Pittsfield, or the Berkshire County Historical Society on East Housatonic Street in the same city.



Utah's Mystery Rock Markings

By Maurice Kildare
From page 39 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Twenty-five miles south of Hanksville, Utah, Louis J. Spear stopped his pickup truck on an old dirt road. He was attracted by an elongated, flat-topped mesa a hundred yards east. Winding his way over the sagebrush flat, he climbed to the top.

While prospecting in new country, he habitually reconnoitered from a promontory to familiarize himself with landmarks and the general lay of the terrain. As a result of this precaution, he had never been lost.

From the mesa top he scanned the immediate vicinity. The first things he saw were several flat-surfaced rocks chiseled with strange markings. Spear instantly realized he had found, or stumbled upon, the mystery rock markings Alex Alexander had told him about 15 years before in Phoenix, Arizona.



Treasure In Maine

By D. Van Atchley
From page 41 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lying off the middle coast of Maine is a small island called Monhegan. Adjacent to it is an even smaller island named Manana.

Years ago, a group of fishermen stopped on Manana Island for a brief respite from fishing. They started a game of soccer to help pass the time and to relax. During the game, one of the crewmen made a wild kick and the skipper ran off to get the ball.

When he found it he noticed something unusual sticking out of the earth. The skipper curiously examined the object and scooped the dirt away from it with his hands. To his astonishment, he discovered that it was a rusty, old iron pot containing many gold and silver coins.



Caretaker's Missing Cache

By Ruth Neal Fox
From page 58 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1905, my mother and father homesteaded a ranch six miles from Grangeville, Idaho, on the old Adams Road. In 1916, they moved to town and hired Hiram Morehouse to stay at the ranch as caretaker and woodcutter.

Morehouse lived alone. He decided that paper money would become useless, so he converted each paycheck into gold coins, put them into a tin box, and buried it. He often said that he didn't want anyone to get his money.

Once when he moved from one cabin to another, he asked Dad to help him. The money was dug up and Dad moved it along with the caretaker's belongings in his wagon. Dad estimated that he had around $10,000 in the tin box.



Outlaw Gold In Horse Thief Meadow

By Art Redmond
From page 60 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


David Copper settled in 1882 on a quarter section of land near
the town of Mount Hood, Oregon. In 1884, a man named Philips en-gaged Cooper to assist him in a search for an outlaw's cabin near where Philips claimed a $25,000 gold cache was hidden. According to Philips, the treasure was stolen in a stagecoach robbery near Walla Walla, Washington, in 1880.

The pair located the bandit's hide-out 25 miles south of Hood River, Oregon, at Horse Thief Meadow. It is not known whether they or anyone else ever recovered the gold, which would have appreciated tremendously at today's prices.



Julian's Lost Jim Green Mine

By Pierson Cronk
From page 61 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Jim Green was a young black man, one of many persons drawn by the lure of gold to southern California a little over 100 years ago. Gold had been discovered 60 miles northeast of San Diego in the vicinity of Volcan Mountain in 1869. Early the next spring, a series of gold claims was filed and a communitv began to grow.

One of the early prospectors, Drue Bailey, hired John Mclntire to survey a township planned to serve the business needs of the miners, and named the village Julian, for a handsome cousin.

As the number of mines increased, a neighboring town called Banner sprang up. The two towns promptly became rivals, and this was the situation when Jim Green rode into Julian looking for a job.



A $50,000 Squirrel Nest

By Burl Hunt
From page 14 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


J.0. Maloney hid his money well. Currency that he hid was found,
but the gold and silver coins still remain hidden near Morris, Connecticut.

Maloney, an old and very secretive recluse, died in 1887. It was known that he possessed large sums of money in the form of paper currency and gold and silver coins. After his death, many attempts were made to locate the money, for no trace of it was found in his house near Morris.

It was assumed that he had hidden his savings somewhere on his property. Many people searched for the old miser's wealth, but each search ended in failure.

Some of Maloney's savings finally were found by accident. Two men hunting squirrels in October of 1887 near the old man's house wounded a gray squirrel.



Lost Cache of Ozark Gold

By Ray D. Rains
From page 15 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


An abandoned garden in Arkansas may have $20,000 in gold coins planted in it, but permission to try to harvest this unusual crop may be difficult to get.

I was allowed by the owners to photograph the dilapidated, old farmhouse in front of the garden, but was denied permission to hunt for the treasure, which on today's collectors' market might be worth $200,000 or more.

The story concerning the buried cache started in Mississippi where, in 1852, prosperous planter John Boggs decided that the slave labor which had gained him wealth over the preceding 12 years was immoral. He sold his land and slaves as a result of his religious convictions and left Mississippi. He headed for the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, where slavery was not regarded as a necessity.



Treasure of the Sinks

By Randy N. Simmons
From page 17 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Deep in a remote area of northeastern Oregon's Blue Mountains is a wild section of country of confusing growth and weirdly jum-bled topography called the Devil's Sink by pioneers. It is an area of legends of death and destruction, and of gold. The gold has been found and lost, and waits to be discovered again. There is also a buried cache of loot taken in a stage robberv nearby that has never been found.

Lying 18 miles due north of the town of Elgin in northern Union County, the Devil's Sink is located in a basin between Little Looking Glass Creek and Mottet Creek. It is an area of slide formations where a thin layer of lava has broken and sunk into the soft earth beneath. It is a scrambled track of broken hills lying under a heavy cover of brush and timber.



Treasure Off Santa Catalina

By Sean Pobuda
From page 19 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When one thinks of Spanish galleons and sunken treasure, one usually thinks of the Caribbean, the Florida Keys, or the Bahamas. But did you know there is a sunken galleon within 30 miles of the millions of people in the Los Angeles area?

On January 7, 1754, the "San Sebastian," of Spain's Manila fleet, was on the homeward leg of its journey from the Philippines to Acapulco. The galleon was sailing through the Santa Barbara channel when the lookout spotted another ship closing on them. Soon the oncoming ship's flag could be seen and the Spanish crew knew they were in trouble. It was the English pirate George Compton. Although the San Sebastian was armed, her captain chose to try to outrun the English ship.



Stolen Steamer Shipments

By Ben Townsend
From page 20 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From the day gold was found along the Yukon in 1882, followed by the big Klondike rush 14 years later, Fairbanks ran over with the glittering commodity.

Sourdoughs, benumbed from unbelievable riches, gave no thought to spending a heavy pouch or two of gold nuggets in Fairbanks' saloons during a single night on the town.

So much gold came into Fairbanks daily that it created a storage problem. Bank vaults were so jammed with it that often their doors could not be shut. Canvas sacks of gold lay piled on the bank's floors, chairs and tables, or wherever space could be made.

Millions of dollars in gold were shipped out of Fairbanks annually. Most went up the Tanana River to the Yukon River, then to Whitehorse and into the United States.



Chief Smallwood's Hoard

By Danny Estes
From page 22 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Benjamin Franklin Smallwood was one of the wealthiest men in the Choctaw Nation. In 1863, he moved to Lehigh, Oklahoma, where he opened a dry goods store and started ranching on a large scale.

It was common knowledge that when someone sold cattle to him, he would go into a back room and take the lid off an apple barrel to get the necessary cash to complete the sale.

In 1888, Smallwood was elected Chief of the Choctaw Nation. During his term, payment was made to the Nation for lands and coal mines. He suggested to the Council that the funds be distri-buted immediately, without waiting for an audit. The Council agreed and it was done forthwith. For his work, he was paid $5,500 from the monies disbursed.



Juan Terron's Pearls

By Tom Townsend
From page 23 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


"No pearls for Juan Terron" is an old Spanish proverb which means a fool makes no profit. The origin of this odd idiom lies in a story of lost treasure.

Juan Terron was a foot soldier with De Sotos ill-fated expedition up the Mississippi River and into Arkansas. Spanish records indicate that De Soto's men found 350 weight of pearls plus figures of babies and birds made from irridescent shells in Georgia in 1539. The treasure was divided among the men and Juan Terron received six pounds of the pearls.