Juan Terron's Pearls

By Tom Townsend
From page 23 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


"No pearls for Juan Terron" is an old Spanish proverb which means a fool makes no profit. The origin of this odd idiom lies in a story of lost treasure.

Juan Terron was a foot soldier with De Sotos ill-fated expedition up the Mississippi River and into Arkansas. Spanish records indicate that De Soto's men found 350 weight of pearls plus figures of babies and birds made from irridescent shells in Georgia in 1539. The treasure was divided among the men and Juan Terron received six pounds of the pearls.



Pancho Villa's Buried Silver

By Jeff W. Henderson
From page 24 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In the road from (San Andres, Chihuahua, Mexico) to Bachiniva, one of the men wounded at San Andres died, recorded Pancho Villa in his memoirs, and we buried him there before continuing to Valie unencumbered, for we had buried the silver, too.

A buried treasure story?

Yes, and it involves 122 bars of silver - silver taken by Pancho Villa when he ambushed a train near Chavarria. Pancho Villa never stashed anything that he didn't return for, according to reports of the legendary Mexican revolutionario. But research has shown that he did not recover the 122 bars of silver referred to above.

The saga began in 1913 when Francisco Pancho Villa returned to Mexico after a short, self-imposed exile in the United States.



Undersea Fortune of the Niagara

By Gerry Erberich
From page 30 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


What possible relationship could there be between an isolationist Congress and 35 gold ingots lying in the wreck of a passenger liner on the ocean floor just off of New Zealand's northeastern coast?

The relationship is direct. The gold, now worth more than $1 million, awaits salvage.

The complicated story began when, before America entered World War II, isolationist Congressmen, representing taxpayers still smarting from war debts incurred during World War I, passed a Cash and Carry Act. It required payment for overseas shipments to be made in gold, and so England had to draw on gold reserves of her commonwealth to get America's much-needed supplies.



Treasure In Massachusetts

By Robert J. Burke
From page 36 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


There are more caves, caverns, crevices, man-made mines and hidden holes in a 20-mile belt extending north to south in western Massachusetts than in any similar area in New England. Legends about lost treasures and rich ore abound around Pittsfield, and most of them sprang from actual happenings.

Clues from history concerning this cave country should give the careful treasure hunter facts to work on. A few are given here. Others could be unearthed with research in the Berkshire Museum on South Street in Pittsfield, or the Berkshire County Historical Society on East Housatonic Street in the same city.



Utah's Mystery Rock Markings

By Maurice Kildare
From page 39 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Twenty-five miles south of Hanksville, Utah, Louis J. Spear stopped his pickup truck on an old dirt road. He was attracted by an elongated, flat-topped mesa a hundred yards east. Winding his way over the sagebrush flat, he climbed to the top.

While prospecting in new country, he habitually reconnoitered from a promontory to familiarize himself with landmarks and the general lay of the terrain. As a result of this precaution, he had never been lost.

From the mesa top he scanned the immediate vicinity. The first things he saw were several flat-surfaced rocks chiseled with strange markings. Spear instantly realized he had found, or stumbled upon, the mystery rock markings Alex Alexander had told him about 15 years before in Phoenix, Arizona.



Treasure In Maine

By D. Van Atchley
From page 41 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Lying off the middle coast of Maine is a small island called Monhegan. Adjacent to it is an even smaller island named Manana.

Years ago, a group of fishermen stopped on Manana Island for a brief respite from fishing. They started a game of soccer to help pass the time and to relax. During the game, one of the crewmen made a wild kick and the skipper ran off to get the ball.

When he found it he noticed something unusual sticking out of the earth. The skipper curiously examined the object and scooped the dirt away from it with his hands. To his astonishment, he discovered that it was a rusty, old iron pot containing many gold and silver coins.



Caretaker's Missing Cache

By Ruth Neal Fox
From page 58 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1905, my mother and father homesteaded a ranch six miles from Grangeville, Idaho, on the old Adams Road. In 1916, they moved to town and hired Hiram Morehouse to stay at the ranch as caretaker and woodcutter.

Morehouse lived alone. He decided that paper money would become useless, so he converted each paycheck into gold coins, put them into a tin box, and buried it. He often said that he didn't want anyone to get his money.

Once when he moved from one cabin to another, he asked Dad to help him. The money was dug up and Dad moved it along with the caretaker's belongings in his wagon. Dad estimated that he had around $10,000 in the tin box.



Outlaw Gold In Horse Thief Meadow

By Art Redmond
From page 60 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


David Copper settled in 1882 on a quarter section of land near
the town of Mount Hood, Oregon. In 1884, a man named Philips en-gaged Cooper to assist him in a search for an outlaw's cabin near where Philips claimed a $25,000 gold cache was hidden. According to Philips, the treasure was stolen in a stagecoach robbery near Walla Walla, Washington, in 1880.

The pair located the bandit's hide-out 25 miles south of Hood River, Oregon, at Horse Thief Meadow. It is not known whether they or anyone else ever recovered the gold, which would have appreciated tremendously at today's prices.



Julian's Lost Jim Green Mine

By Pierson Cronk
From page 61 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Jim Green was a young black man, one of many persons drawn by the lure of gold to southern California a little over 100 years ago. Gold had been discovered 60 miles northeast of San Diego in the vicinity of Volcan Mountain in 1869. Early the next spring, a series of gold claims was filed and a communitv began to grow.

One of the early prospectors, Drue Bailey, hired John Mclntire to survey a township planned to serve the business needs of the miners, and named the village Julian, for a handsome cousin.

As the number of mines increased, a neighboring town called Banner sprang up. The two towns promptly became rivals, and this was the situation when Jim Green rode into Julian looking for a job.



A $50,000 Squirrel Nest

By Burl Hunt
From page 14 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


J.0. Maloney hid his money well. Currency that he hid was found,
but the gold and silver coins still remain hidden near Morris, Connecticut.

Maloney, an old and very secretive recluse, died in 1887. It was known that he possessed large sums of money in the form of paper currency and gold and silver coins. After his death, many attempts were made to locate the money, for no trace of it was found in his house near Morris.

It was assumed that he had hidden his savings somewhere on his property. Many people searched for the old miser's wealth, but each search ended in failure.

Some of Maloney's savings finally were found by accident. Two men hunting squirrels in October of 1887 near the old man's house wounded a gray squirrel.



Lost Cache of Ozark Gold

By Ray D. Rains
From page 15 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


An abandoned garden in Arkansas may have $20,000 in gold coins planted in it, but permission to try to harvest this unusual crop may be difficult to get.

I was allowed by the owners to photograph the dilapidated, old farmhouse in front of the garden, but was denied permission to hunt for the treasure, which on today's collectors' market might be worth $200,000 or more.

The story concerning the buried cache started in Mississippi where, in 1852, prosperous planter John Boggs decided that the slave labor which had gained him wealth over the preceding 12 years was immoral. He sold his land and slaves as a result of his religious convictions and left Mississippi. He headed for the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, where slavery was not regarded as a necessity.



Treasure of the Sinks

By Randy N. Simmons
From page 17 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Deep in a remote area of northeastern Oregon's Blue Mountains is a wild section of country of confusing growth and weirdly jum-bled topography called the Devil's Sink by pioneers. It is an area of legends of death and destruction, and of gold. The gold has been found and lost, and waits to be discovered again. There is also a buried cache of loot taken in a stage robberv nearby that has never been found.

Lying 18 miles due north of the town of Elgin in northern Union County, the Devil's Sink is located in a basin between Little Looking Glass Creek and Mottet Creek. It is an area of slide formations where a thin layer of lava has broken and sunk into the soft earth beneath. It is a scrambled track of broken hills lying under a heavy cover of brush and timber.



Treasure Off Santa Catalina

By Sean Pobuda
From page 19 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


When one thinks of Spanish galleons and sunken treasure, one usually thinks of the Caribbean, the Florida Keys, or the Bahamas. But did you know there is a sunken galleon within 30 miles of the millions of people in the Los Angeles area?

On January 7, 1754, the "San Sebastian," of Spain's Manila fleet, was on the homeward leg of its journey from the Philippines to Acapulco. The galleon was sailing through the Santa Barbara channel when the lookout spotted another ship closing on them. Soon the oncoming ship's flag could be seen and the Spanish crew knew they were in trouble. It was the English pirate George Compton. Although the San Sebastian was armed, her captain chose to try to outrun the English ship.



Stolen Steamer Shipments

By Ben Townsend
From page 20 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


From the day gold was found along the Yukon in 1882, followed by the big Klondike rush 14 years later, Fairbanks ran over with the glittering commodity.

Sourdoughs, benumbed from unbelievable riches, gave no thought to spending a heavy pouch or two of gold nuggets in Fairbanks' saloons during a single night on the town.

So much gold came into Fairbanks daily that it created a storage problem. Bank vaults were so jammed with it that often their doors could not be shut. Canvas sacks of gold lay piled on the bank's floors, chairs and tables, or wherever space could be made.

Millions of dollars in gold were shipped out of Fairbanks annually. Most went up the Tanana River to the Yukon River, then to Whitehorse and into the United States.



Chief Smallwood's Hoard

By Danny Estes
From page 22 of the May, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Benjamin Franklin Smallwood was one of the wealthiest men in the Choctaw Nation. In 1863, he moved to Lehigh, Oklahoma, where he opened a dry goods store and started ranching on a large scale.

It was common knowledge that when someone sold cattle to him, he would go into a back room and take the lid off an apple barrel to get the necessary cash to complete the sale.

In 1888, Smallwood was elected Chief of the Choctaw Nation. During his term, payment was made to the Nation for lands and coal mines. He suggested to the Council that the funds be distri-buted immediately, without waiting for an audit. The Council agreed and it was done forthwith. For his work, he was paid $5,500 from the monies disbursed.



Demon Gold of the Solitario

By Jeff Ferguson
From page 19 of the April, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In early April of 1502, the Spanish treasure galleon "Solitario" nestled quietly against a wide, crowded wharf in the harbor of Santo Domingo on the West Indian island of Hispaniola. The sun was high in a cloudless sky and the mix of chattering voices rose in a gentle babble to the deck. The ship's captain, Alfredo Calderon de Ia Barba, lounged against the high stern rail and watched the throng of slaves swirl about in little human eddies.



Hidden Bank Loot In Indiana

By Richard T. Grybos
From page 22 of the April, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On Halloween night in 1967, Henry M. Gargano, Clifton Daniels and two female companions were captured at a cottage refuge in Fish Lake, Indiana, after robbing a bank in Northiake, Illinois, three days earlier. Some of the stolen money was found near the bank and in the cottage, but well over $40,000 was never recovered and is believed to be buried somewhere in the thick woods around Fish Lake.

Gargano seems to have favored this area as a hiding place for cash. He bragged to police that he hid $27,000 from a 1956 rob-bery there before being captured. The money was never located. He said he later picked it up and fled to Mexico.



Lost Cherokee Mine In North Carolina

By Michael Paul Henson
From page 23 of the April, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Somewhere in the Nantahala Mountains of southwestern North Carolina is a rich deposit of silver that was known to the Cherokee Indians, but kept secret from the white men.

The first white settlers in the area found an old Indian, whom the Cherokees called Sontechee, living at the mouth of a stream now known as Factory Creek. At that point, there was a large shelf of rock partly covering the entrance to what was once a large cavern in the hillside.

The settlers wondered why the Indian had no squaw and lived apart from others, seldom leaving the cave's entrance. Sontechee was highly regarded by the Cherokees and was always supplied with what he needed.



Captain Marcy's Buried Treasure

By Eugene R. Anderson
From page 24 of the April, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


October 16, 1849 - I have taken five of our oldest wagons to pieces and placed them in a low place near the creek on the south side of the road. I have also had other surplus articles boxed up and buried about fifty yards from the road and a large fire made on the spot.

Thus wrote Capt. Randolph B. Marcy in his diary on his return march to Fort Smith, Arkansas, after having commanded a military escort for emigrants to Santa Fe.



Counterfeiter Duff's Lost Treasure Cave

By John K. Ward
From page 29 of the April, 1976 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 1976 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


A counterfeiter's treasure hoard lies in a cave or caves somewhere in the lower Ohio River Valley. It has been there for more than 175 years, secreted by a counterfeiter named John Duff.

Duff originally worked in the vicinity of Cave In Rock along the Ohio River in southern Illinois. He had learned that the lead deposits on the Saline River in Illinois contained some silver. He used the lead and silver with other metals to counterfeit the coins.

Although Cave In Rock was the headquarters of a ruthless gang of river pirates and murderers, Duff appears never to have been involved in their activities.