Electroscopes by Thomas

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I bought an Electroscope by Thomas, the "Model 20". Has anyone out there ever used one of these and had any luck? If so any pointers in using it will be most appreciated.

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Electroscopes by Thomas

Dan-
Appreciate the info provided. IMO it's not a slam dunk against Electroscopes, considering Fooleo & team saw them in action last fall'09 in PA with Thomas & team. I saw those dozen or so videos and believe that Leo, Jeff & Loralie would've questioned their functionality, if they believed the lrls to be fraudulent. I haven't purchased one either, but haven't ruled it out completely.

David - I was wondering what decision you had made regarding lrls'and now I know. LT on the homepage does have links to other lrls,like OKM & Accurate Locators, but I haven't done the research to make a decision. They appear significantly more expensive than the Electroscopes.

HH

Treasure Hunter ronald dix's picture
Treasure Hunter ronald dix (not verified)
electroscope by thomas

HELLO,I USED AN ELECTROSCOPE FOR SEVERAL YEARS.IT DOES WORK,I HAVE PROVED IT MANY TIMES. ONCE I HAD A VERY STRONG SIGNAL FROM ABOUT HALF A MILE AWAY,TRACKED IT DOWN TO THE SPECIFIC FIELD.BUT I WAS REFUSED PERMISSION TO SEARCH THE FIELD.THE OLD FARMER DIED TWO YEARS LATER,AND HIS YOUNGER SON TOOK OVER THE FARM.HE GAVE PERMISSION TO A MAN AND WIFE METAL DETECTORISTS.THEY FOUND A ROMAN HOARD WORTH £20,000.I LATER ON I MET THIS COUPLE AT A CAR BOOT SALE, AND ASKED WHERE THEY FOUND IT.HE SAID HE WASNT GOING TO TELL ANYONE.WHEN I TOLD HIM WHAT FIELD IT WAS IN, AND THE POSITION OF IT IN THE FIELD,HE WAS BUMB-FOUNDED. I HAVE MANY OTHER TRUE TRUE EVENTS
RON.D.

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Electroscope

Great job Dan, I can't see anyone purchasing one of these units after reading the report.

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Inside the Electroscope 20

An electronics engineer took apart an Electroscope 20, and here is his conclusion:

"Both the main unit, and the accessories, are stuffed full of do-nothing garbage, and a great deal of effort was made in preventing anyone from determining what the Electroscope is all about. Once dissected, it should be obvious to anyone, even those without a technical background, what the Electroscope really is: an ordinary dowsing rod, with a voltage applied to the antennae. The accessories are entirely bogus, and serve no useful purpose. The four items described here (Model 20, Phaser, and two modules) have a total price tag of $1283, but there is only about $10 worth of "technology" in all of it."

Here's the whole story, with photos and schematics:

http://tinyurl.com/yl6ocet

---Dan Hughes, http://treasuremanual.com

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Here is what the US Dept of

Here is what the US Dept of Justice has to say about these Long-Distance Locators:

There is a rather large community of people around the world that believes in dowsing: the ancient practice of using forked sticks, swinging rods, and pendulums to look for underground water and other materials. These people believe that many types of materials can be located using a variety of dowsing methods. Dowsers claim that the dowsing device will respond to any buried anomalies, and years of practice are needed to use the device with discrimination (the ability to cause the device to respond to only those materials being sought).

Modern dowsers have been developing various new methods to add discrimination to their devices. These new methods include molecular frequency discrimination (MFD) and harmonic induction discrimination (HID). MFD has taken the form of everything from placing a xerox copy of a Poloroid photograph of the desired material into the handle of the device, to using dowsing rods in conjunction with frequency generation electronics (function generators). None of these attempts to create devices that can detect specific materials such as explosives (or any materials for that matter) have been proven successful in controlled double-blind scientific tests. In fact, all testing of these inventions has shown these devices to perform no better than random chance.

Mostly these devices are used to locate water and now are used extensively by treasure hunters looking for gold and silver. In recent years some makers of these dowsing devices have attempted to cross over from treasure hunting to the areas of contraband detection, search and rescue, and law enforcement. The Quadro Tracker is one notable example of this cross-over attempt. This device was advertised as being a serious technology with a realistic sounding description of how it worked (close examination showed serious errors in the scientific sounding description). Fortunately, the National Institute of Justice investigated this company and stopped the sale of this device for these purposes, but not before many law enforcement agencies and school districts wasted public funds on the purchase of these devices.

Things to look for when dealing with “new technologies” that may well be a dowsing device are words like molecular frequency discrimination, harmonic induction discrimination, and claims of detecting small objects at large distances. Many of these devices require no power to operate (most real technology requires power). Suspect any device that uses a swinging rod that is held nearly level, pivots freely and “indicates” the material being sought by pointing at it. Any device that uses a pendulum that swings in different shaped paths to indicate its response should also arouse suspicion.

Advertisements that feature several testimonials by “satisfied users,” and statements about pending tests by scientific and regulatory agencies (but have just not happened yet) may be indications that the device has not been proven to work. Statements that the device must be held by a human to operate usually indicate dowsing devices. Statements that the device requires extensive training by the factory, the device is difficult to use, and not everyone can use the device, are often made to allow the manufacturer a way of blaming the operator for the device’s failure to work.

Another often used diversion is that scientists and engineers cannot understand the operation of the device or the device operates on principles that have been lost or forgotten by the scientific community.

---Dan Hughes, http://treasuremanual.com

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Electroscope by Thomas,

David-

I haven't used one, but you may wan to contact Leo Aranza ("Fooleo" channel here & on Youtube). He emailed me that he uses the Fieldscope model and may recommend it.
http://www.electroscopes.com/index.html

I've viewed his videos here,titled "The Pennsylvania Chronicles" when his SoCal team visited and detected with Thomas Afilani,Mike Bowers, et. al, last fall in Pa. They used several models in the videos and I too, am interested in the model B.

Excerpt from last month's correspondence :

-----Original Message-----
From: xxxxaranza
To: kschae4ataol [dot] com
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2010 11:55 am
Subject: RE: LRLs comments requested

Hi Ken,

"In response to your inquiry about lrl's -- we believe they are definitely a valid tool, but like anything else, there's a learning curve. There are some situations where these units won't be of any value, like areas that have metal fencing, electrical/cable lines, etc. - there'd be way too much interference. Thomas Afilani knows his lrl's so well that he can tell you what metal is being detected, just by the way the thing "pulls" - i was impressed. Personally, i use the Fieldscope and i have found coins with it (and my detector), so i know the technology works."

Hope this helps.

kschae4

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